Severe Indigestion Before Period

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    is it common for women to experience severe rage and jealousy during perimenopause?
    i never was like this before. i'm 47 and it's been coming on about the last year.

    • ANSWER:
      these are the 35 common symptoms of the menopause;

      1. Hot flashes, flushes, night sweats and/or cold flashes, clammy feeling
      2. Irregular heart beat
      3. Irritability
      4. Mood swings, sudden tears
      5. Trouble sleeping through the night
      6. Irregular periods; shorter, lighter periods; heavier periods, flooding; phantom periods, shorter cycles, longer cycles
      7. Loss of libido
      8. Dry vagina
      9. Crashing fatigue
      10. Anxiety, feeling ill at ease
      11. Feelings of dread, apprehension, doom
      12. Difficulty concentrating, disorientation, mental confusion
      13. Disturbing memory lapses
      14. Incontinence, especially upon sneezing, laughing; urge incontinence
      15. Itchy, crawly skin
      16. Aching, sore joints, muscles and tendons
      17. Increased tension in muscles
      18. Breast tenderness
      19. Headache change: increase or decrease
      20. Gastrointestinal distress, indigestion, flatulence, gas pain, nausea
      21. Sudden bouts of bloat
      22. Depression
      23. Exacerbation of existing conditions
      24. Increase in allergies
      25. Weight gain
      26. Hair loss or thinning, head, pubic, or whole body; increase in facial hair
      27. Dizziness, lightheartedness, episodes of loss of balance
      28. Changes in body odour
      29. Electric shock sensation under the skin and in the head
      30. Tingling in the extremities
      31. Gum problems, increased bleeding
      32. Burning tongue, burning roof of mouth, bad taste in mouth, change in breath odour
      33. Osteoporosis
      34. Changes in fingernails: softer, crack or break easier
      35. Tinnitus: ringing in ears, bells, 'whooshing,' buzzing etc.

      hope this answers your question!

  2. QUESTION:
    is it possible to feel your uterus contracting during a period?
    last night I had the worst period cramps I have ever had!
    I put my hand on my uterus, and I felt it move
    IS IT REALLY POSSIBLE? or was it something else?
    I ws bloated to.

    • ANSWER:
      Around the time ovulation happens there is a pain in the back, abdomen or even dizziness. Just about a week before the actual menstrual period flow starts, the woman may experience bloating. This is water retention on legs and around the middle, sometimes even the face. The other symptoms are breast tenderness, decreased activity levels and lack of sleep. Some women also experience changes in appetite while some others break out in acne. There sometimes seems to be a slight loss of coordination, so many women experience trouble in driving in this PMS state. A woman approaching this time usually experiences attacks of anxiety and social withdrawal. The most common of all symptoms, is irritability or moodiness, depression and angry outbursts. Nausea, headache, gas in the abdomen, indigestion and sometimes even diarrhea are common symptoms and pains of menstrual period. If these pains get more severe than normal, they are taken to be a disorder called dysmenorrhea.

  3. QUESTION:
    What is Gluten and how does it negatively affect the body?
    I want to know what Gluten is and how I can have a 'gluten free' diet.

    • ANSWER:
      First, if you have not been tested, it is important to get tested BEFORE you start the diet, because after you are on a gluten-free diet, there is no way to test for celiac disease or gluten sensitivity, and having a medical diagnosis can be important for your health and make things much easier for you in the long run.

      WHAT IS GLUTEN?

      Gluten is the protein in wheat, rye, and barley. (Oats are very similar, or are often contaminated with wheat, and some people who are gluten intolerant also react to oats.) Gluten is very common in processed foods, and a truly gluten-free diet is a lot harder than just avoiding pizza and pasta. It involves checking every ingredient of every food, drink, medication, and other products you can accidentally swallow just by touching your mouth, such as shampoos, lotions, chap stick, and makeup. (Yes, some people are THAT sensitive to it. But others are less sensitive.)

      The easiest way to start a gluten-free diet is to start with plain, fresh (no sauces, no seasonings, no marinades...) meat and veggies and potatoes. Stick with this simple, plain diet till you can find resources to learn all the things you can and can't have. With the growing market for gluten-free food, there is now a wide variety of gluten-free options, including bread, pizza, crackers, and pasta. These are often made from rice or corn instead of the usual wheat. Find a support group or visit a gluten-free forum (see sources links) to learn the nitty-gritty details of the diet.

      SYMPTOMS

      There are 200-300 different symptoms that can be caused by gluten sensitivity. They range from
      --digestive issues (diarrhea, constipation, indigestion, reflux, weight gain, weight loss, bloating, abdominal pain...);
      --to mental health issues (depression, anxiety, mood swings, behavior problems...);
      --to inflammation issues (aching joints, bones, muscles, increased asthma...);
      --to neurological issues (migraines, vertigo, tingling, numbness, weird sensations...);
      --to a wide variety of malnutrition-related and other issues (fatigue, brain fog, canker sores, osteoporosis, infertility, enamel problems, missed periods, painful periods, night sweats, thyroid problems, frequent infections...)

      HOW IT AFFECTS THE BODY

      Most doctors don't think a gluten-free diet is necessary for everyone, only those who have celiac disease or another form of gluten sensitivity.

      About one percent of the population has celiac disease, which is an autoimmune disease. When they eat gluten, it triggers an immune response in which the body attacks itself, eventually destroying the villi of the intestines and making it difficult for you to absorb the nutrients you need. Fortunately, a very strict gluten free diet almost always leads to a complete recovery. However, in rare cases, it can leave permanent nerve damage. Celiac disease can also lead to many other debilitating and even deadly conditions, from other autoimmune diseases to cancer.

      About 12 percent of the population has elevated antibodies in their blood that indicate some form of immune response to eating gluten, but do not have the classic damage to the intestines that doctors in the U.S. use to define celiac disease. Some of these people also have severe and wide-ranging symptoms. A recent study showed that even without the damaged villi of the so-called "gold standard" for celiac disease, those who have these elevated antibodies to gluten still have an elevated risk of death if they do not go on a gluten free diet.

      Beyond that, some medical practitioners (many alternative and whole health practitioners as well as some specialists) think that a much higher percent of the population (a few on the outskirts would say everyone) have negative health impacts (ranging from digestive problems to fatigue) from eating gluten. Grains are very hard to digest to begin with, and over time, through selective breeding in the agricultural industry, the gluten content in the grains we eat has grown. This is sort of a far outfield idea. But almost everyone agrees that more research is needed to understand the full spectrum of gluten sensitivity.

  4. QUESTION:
    Quesion about PMS and how long it should last?
    So, it's been probably two years before my period started, and just now I've gotten PMS. My periods are really inconsistent, sometimes only once every three months. Usually they happen around the 15-20th when they do happen. I have indigestion, and a lot of different areas on my body ache (abdomen and down to genitals, side of chest, arms, back of neck, never below my thighs though), light headaches, not needing to burp but feeling like it, and slight acid reflux that's probably from indigestion? I've never had any of this before Tuesday. It's a mild discomfort, not severe. It's been like this for around 5 days? Looking for what indigestion might mean is a bad idea, and I know that, but I'm paranoid about it anyway. Based off my symptoms, do I have PMS? Should I be as worried as I am? I'm 13, by the way, if that helps? Thanks.

    • ANSWER:
      PMS can last 1-2 weeks. Symptoms occur a week or two before monthly menstruation begins, and ordinarily, they disappear at that time.

  5. QUESTION:
    How does the body change during pregnancy?
    What changes occur in the appearance of the woman? And where does the weight normally go to? Do some women only gain in their belly area? I would think that a woman who is in good shape and continues to eat right during pregnancy would only get a belly, and not much more fat. Is this correct? I'm worrying about the shape of my body being different after baby because somebody told me, you can lose the weight but never get your shape back because it's different after the baby. Is this always true?

    • ANSWER:
      Pregnancy is a natural state and one that is different for every woman every time. I have had three pregnancies and deliveries and they were all different. You never know exactly what you¡¦re going to get, but it does help to be prepared by knowing what changes your body will likely go through. Follow the changes your body goes through trimester by trimester. You can expect to feel all or some of them.

      The first trimester (Week 1 - Week 12)

      „h Cessation of menstrual period

      „h Morning sickness that occurs at any time, day or night, or all day and night. This includes nausea and/or vomiting

      „h Excessive saliva

      „h Swollen and tender breasts

      „h Darkening of the areola

      „h Frequent urination

      „h Fatigue

      „h Constipation

      „h Heartburn

      „h Mood swings -- feel angry, sad, or happy for no reason

      „h Stuffy nose and allergies¡Xeven if you have never suffered from them before

      „h Food cravings

      The second trimester (Week 13 - Week 26)

      „h Weight gain and thickening of the waist

      „h Fetal movement

      „h Dry skin on stomach where the skin is stretching

      „h Breasts increase in size¡Xtime for new bras

      „h Hemorrhoids

      „h Heartburn

      „h Indigestion

      „h Constipation

      „h Nosebleeds

      „h Slight swelling of the feet, hands, ankles and face

      „h Development of a dark line on the skin between your navel and your pubic area.

      „h Development of a "mask" or darker area on your face

      „h Backaches that can remain throughout pregnancy

      „h Nipple secretions

      „h Muscle cramps, particularly in the legs and at night

      „h Gas pains

      „h Changes in your hair: it can become less oily

      „h Skin problems

      The third trimester (Week 27 - 40)

      „h Increased fetal movement

      „h Protrusion of navel

      „h Increased backaches

      „h Shortness of breath

      „h Braxton Hicks contractions AKA false labor

      „h Groin pains

      „h Stretch marks

      „h Difficulty sleeping

      „h Varicose veins

      Your entire system is readjusted when you¡¦re pregnant. The heart pumps more blood and the lungs work more efficiently, as does the digestive system. With these and more changes occurring, it is no wonder that pregnancy can be uncomfortable. Minor aches and pains can be dealt with; however, you should never ignore pain or extreme fatigue, which can be warning signs of trouble. Always consult your health care provider if you experience any of these changes:

      „h pain or burning during urination

      „h vaginal spotting or bleeding

      „h leaking or gushing from vagina

      „h blister or sore in vaginal area

      „h uterine contractions

      „h severe nausea or vomiting

      „h severe abdominal pain

      „h chills and fever over 100 degrees

      „h dizziness or lightheadedness

      „h severe headache

      „h swelling of the face, eyes, fingers or toes

      „h sudden weight gain

      „h visual problems

      „h noticeably reduced fetal movement

      „h absence of fetal movement for 24 hours

      „h a hot, reddened painful area behind your knee or calf

      And just when you think you can¡¦t take it another day¡Xta da! ¡Xthe biggest changes of all: labor and delivery!

  6. QUESTION:
    How do you know if you have depression?
    How do you know if you suffer from depression without going to your doctor first? And if you have depression does that necessarily mean that you suicidal?

    • ANSWER:
      Two hallmarks of depression - symptoms key to establishing a diagnosis - are:

      Loss of interest in normal daily activities. You lose interest in or pleasure from activities that you used to enjoy.
      Depressed mood. You feel sad, helpless or hopeless, and may have crying spells.
      In addition, for a doctor or other health professional to diagnose depression, most of the following signs and symptoms also must be present for at least two weeks.

      Sleep disturbances. Sleeping too much or having problems sleeping can be a sign you're depressed. Waking in the middle of the night or early in the morning and not being able to get back to sleep are typical.
      Impaired thinking or concentration. You may have trouble concentrating or making decisions and have problems with memory.
      Changes in weight. An increased or reduced appetite and unexplained weight gain or loss may indicate depression.
      Agitation. You may seem restless, agitated, irritable and easily annoyed.
      Fatigue or slowing of body movements. You feel weariness and lack of energy nearly every day. You may feel as tired in the morning as you did when you went to bed the night before. You may feel like you're doing everything in slow motion, or you may speak in a slow, monotonous tone.
      Low self-esteem. You feel worthless and have excessive guilt.
      Less interest in sex. If you were sexually active before developing depression, you may notice a dramatic decrease in your level of interest in having sexual relations.
      Thoughts of death. You have a persistent negative view of yourself, your situation and the future. You may have thoughts of death, dying or suicide.
      Depression can also cause a wide variety of physical complaints, such as gastrointestinal problems (indigestion, constipation or diarrhea), headache and backache. Many people with depression also have symptoms of anxiety.

      Children, teens and older adults may react differently to depression. In these groups, symptoms may take different forms or may be masked by other conditions. Kids may pretend to be sick, worry that a parent is going to die, perform poorly in school, refuse to go to school, or exhibit behavioral problems. Older people may be more willing to discuss the physical manifestations of depression, instead of their emotional difficulties.

      Types of depression
      The main types of depression include:

      Major depression. This type of mood disturbance lasts more than two weeks. Symptoms may include overwhelming feelings of sadness and grief, loss of interest or pleasure in activities you usually enjoy, and feelings of worthlessness or guilt. This type of depression may result in poor sleep, a change in appetite, severe fatigue and difficulty concentrating. Severe depression may increase the risk of suicide.
      Dysthymia. Dysthymia (dis-THI-me-uh) is a less severe but more chronic form of depression. Signs and symptoms usually aren't disabling, and periods of dysthymia can alternate with short periods of feeling normal. Having dysthymia places you at an increased risk of major depression.
      Adjustment disorders. If a loved one dies, you lose your job or you receive a diagnosis of cancer, it's perfectly normal to feel tense, sad, overwhelmed or angry. Eventually, most people come to terms with the lasting consequences of life stresses, but some don't. This is what's known as an adjustment disorder - when your response to a stressful event or situation causes signs and symptoms of depression. Some people develop an adjustment disorder in response to a single event. In others, it stems from a combination of stressors. Adjustment disorders can be acute (lasting less than six months) or chronic (lasting longer). Doctors classify adjustment disorders based on the primary signs and symptoms of depression or anxiety.
      Bipolar disorder. Having recurrent episodes of depression and elation (mania) is characteristic of bipolar disorder. Because this condition involves emotions at both extremes (poles), it's called bipolar disorder or manic-depressive disorder. Mania affects your judgment, causing you to make unwise decisions. Some people have bursts of increased creativity and productivity during the manic phase. The number of episodes at either extreme may not be equal. Some people may have several episodes of depression before having another manic phase, or vice versa.
      Seasonal affective disorder. Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a pattern of depression related to changes in seasons and a lack of exposure to sunlight. It may cause headaches, irritability and a low energy level.

  7. QUESTION:
    How do you know if you are allergic to gluten?
    Can someone please tell me what the sypmtoms are?

    • ANSWER:
      There are 200-300 different symptoms, and the severity and combination of symptoms are different for everyone. Some people with celiac disease have no symptoms.

      The following symptoms could all be caused by gluten sensitivity:

      Digestive issues (indigestion, diarrhea, constipation, bloating, acid reflux, abdominal pain, weight gain, weight loss, nausea, dizzyness, loss of appetite, increased appetite, vomiting, really bad smells...)

      Mental health issues (depression, anxiety, mood swings, "behavioral problems" ... I've seen case studies of individuals previously misdiagnosed as autistic, bipolar, schizophrenic, anorexic... and I'm not talking about people with these conditions who merely do better on a GF diet, but whose symptoms completely go away as they heal and get the proper nutrients going to their brain.)

      Neurological issues (tingling, numbness, weird sensations, migraines, vertigo...)

      Inflammation issues (aching joints or bones, asthma, sinus inflammation, fibromyalgia, flu-like feelings, acne, skin rashes...)

      Malnutrition issues (and these vary widely because every system in your body needs proper nutrition to function properly: thinning bones, miscarriages, missed periods, painful periods, infertility, temperature fluctuations, lots of infections, fatigue, headaches, seizures, canker sores ... just about any symptom you can't find a concrete cause for...)

      Most doctors are unlikely to be familiar with the true nature of celiac disease (97 percent of people in the U.S. who have this disease do not know they have it; the average time for diagnosis in the U.S. is 11-13 years.) So getting tested may mean educating yourself about celiac disease, and then demanding the tests, or seeking out a doctor who specializes in gluten intolerance.

      You should definitely get tested BEFORE you start a GF diet, because once you have started the diet, all tests will come back negative regardless of whether or not you are sensitive to gluten. And if you are sensitive to gluten, having that positive diagnosis will make things much, much, much easier on you. Nobody likes people who are "fussy," and this is a high-maintenance diet. Having that medical diagnosis can be very helpful in protecting your health.

      That said, unfortunately, many people who test negative still feel much better and have a lot of pretty severe symptoms disappear on a GF diet. So the tests won't always be able to tell you if gluten is a problem for you. If you have lots of unexplained health issues, or just feel that your body is acting/feeling older than it should, (first get tested, but then) try eliminating all gluten from your diet for 3 weeks, see if you feel better, and then try eating gluten and see how your body reacts.

  8. QUESTION:
    could citalopram make my periods irregular?
    I have been taking citalopram for a month and i cant remember my last period.( i was always a bit useless with remembering when it was anyway.) But it has definatly been 5 weeks since the last one.

    • ANSWER:
      you'll notice under Common side effects "painful menstruation", under Less Common "loss of menstruation", and under Rare many serious conditions.

      keep in mind ALL medications must list any and all side effects that took place in all studies, even if a very small number showed these symptoms. even Tylenol has a long list of serious possible side effects, all medications do. I'd see your doctor and explain what's going on though, based on the list containing "loss of menstruation", because I'd be concerned about any other more serious side effects you may not notice or could develop. don't stop taking the medication before seeing your doctor.

      ======

      Celexa ( Citalopram ) Important
      DO NOT STOP without consulting your physician.

      Celexa ( Citalopram ) ( Symptoms or Effects )

      Common: Abdominal pain, agitation, anxiety,diarrhea, drowsiness, dry mouth, ejaculation disorders, fatigue, impotence, indigestion, insomnia, loss of appetite, nausea, *****painful menstruation, respiratory tract infection, sinus or inflammation, sweating, tremor, and / or, vomiting.

      Less Common: Amnesia, attempted suicide, confusion, coughing, decreased sexual drive, depression, excessive urination, fever, gas, impaired concentration, increased appetite, increased salivation, itching, joint pain, lack of emotion, *****loss of menstruation, low blood pressure, migraine, muscle pain, rapid heartbeat, rash, skin tingling, taste disturbances, visual disturbances, weight gain, weight loss, yawning

      Rare: Abnormal dreams, acne, aggressive behavior, alcohol intolerance, angina ( chest pain ), arthritis, belching, bone pain, breast enlargement, breast pain, bronchitis, bruising, chills, conjunctivitis (pinkeye), decreased muscle movements, delusions, dermatitis, difficulty breathing, difficulty swallowing, dizziness, drug dependence, dry eyes, dry skin, eczema, emotional instability, excessive milk flow, excessive muscle tone, eye pain, fainting, feeling of well-being, flu-like symptoms, flushing, frequent urination, gum inflammation, hair loss, hallucinations, heart attack, heart failure, hemorrhoids, high blood pressure, hives, hot flashes, inability to hold urine, inability to urinate completely, increased sex drive, increased urination, involuntary muscle movements, leg cramps, mouth sores, muscle weakness, nosebleeds, numbness, painful erection, painful urination, panic, paranoia, pneumonia, psoriasis, psychosis, ringing in the ears, sensitivity to light, skin discoloration, slow heartbeat, stomach and intestinal inflammation, stroke, swelling, teeth grinding, thirst, uncontrollable muscle movements, unsteady or abnormal walk, vaginal bleeding.

      See physician always: An allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of the throat, swelling of the lips, tongue, or face, or hives), an irregular heartbeat or pulse, low blood pressure ( dizziness, weakness ), high blood pressure ( severe headache, blurred vision ), or chills or fever.

      See physician if severe: Headache, tremor, nervousness, anxiety, nausea, diarrhea, dry mouth, or changes in appetite or weight, sleepiness or insomnia, decreased sex drive, impotence, or difficulty having an orgasm.

      See physician NOW: An allergic reaction ( difficulty breathing; closing of the throat, swelling of the lips, tongue, or face, or hives ), an irregular heartbeat or pulse, low blood pressure ( dizziness, weakness ), high blood pressure ( severe headache, blurred vision ), or chills or fever.

      Tell your doctor if you:

      * Have liver disease.
      * Have kidney disease.
      * Suffer from seizures.
      * Suffer from mania or have suicidal thoughts.

      Take With: With or without food and with a full glass (8 ounces) of water, it the same time everyday.

      Full Benefits In: Several months.

      Missed Dose(s): If within one hour take, if over an hour skip and then continue on your normal schedule.
      Never Take a Double Dose

      Overdose symptoms include: Nausea, vomiting, tremor, drowsiness, dizziness, sweating, and a fast heartbeat.

  9. QUESTION:
    When I get my periods,I experience severe pain in my stomach,can u girls suggest some solution to my problem?
    I have visited my doc.several times for this,but she gives me painkillers and it eventually subsides,but every month it continues,I cannot bear the pain and even I cry,it also affects my work,u know I have to take leave for this reason.I just sit there or lie down holding my stomach,its just too much for me.It is happening from the last 5-6 years.Can u girls please help me with some solution to my problem?

    • ANSWER:
      Try dese....

      # You could be getting the pain due to irregular and obstructed blood flow. The following home remedies will prove useful in relieving your condition.

      # Fry 12 centigrams the gum of asafetida in pure clarified butter and mix this with 120 gms of fresh goat’s milk and 1 tbsp of honey.

      # Take a hot water bag or a heating pad and hot ferment your back and abdominal area 4 to 5 times a day.

      # Roast some carom seeds seeds on a pan and tie them in a thin cotton cloth. You can ferment your lower abdominal area and back to reduce the pain. Reheat the tied seeds from the pan and use it for at least 10 to 15 minutes.

      # Pound a piece of fresh ginger root and boil it in a cup of water. Add 1 tsp of sugar or honey to it and drink this solution 3 times a day after having you meals. This will regulate bleeding and decrease the menstrual pain.

      Heat Up

      # One remedy for your menstrual mid-section anguish is heat. Using a heating pad on the abdomen for 20 minutes, or more depending on your preference, can relax the abdominal muscles and release tension. Also try a hot bath, possibly with music or scented oils to increase relaxation.

      Exercise

      # Exercise during menstruation has been shown to lessen the severity of menstrual pains such as stomach cramps as well. Not only will exercise help your brain release endorphins, a natural pain killer, but they will also help to stretch out your muscles and increase blood flow. Exercises such as yoga are great for menstrual stomach pain because they not only add exercise and stretching, but also relaxation which lessens muscle tension even more so.

      Hot Tea

      # Herbal teas can be great for treating stomach pains as they are gentle on the stomach and can relax and calm you. Chamomile and lavender are both great for increasing relaxation and decreasing menstrual anxiety, thus helping relieve tension in the abdominal muscles.

      Diet

      # During menstruation, avoiding certain foods can decrease stomach pain as well. Foods high in sodium and carbonated sodas should be avoided because they promote bloating which can contribute to your stomach pains. Also it's important to eat foods high in iron during menstruation in order to make up for iron lost during your period, as iron deficiency can cause stomach problems such as nausea. Also avoid foods that you know you are sensitive to during menstruation in order to decrease any additional stomach pain.

      Medication

      # Taking over-the-counter medications such as Tylenol, during your period can also help ease stomach pains. Taking it during your period, even before pain presents itself, can help prevent and alleviate any stomach pain during menstruation. As with any medication though, talk to your doctor if you choose to treat your pain with medication. You can also try medication such as Pepto Bismol if you suffer from indigestion during your period.

      Warnings

      # Sometimes severe stomach pains during menstruation can be the sign of a deeper problem, such as endometriosis. If you have severe stomach pain that inhibits your daily life during menstruation you should see your doctor to ensure it is not a more serious condition

  10. QUESTION:
    what nonmedicinal ways to help with period inflammation, pain, low appetite, and indigestion?
    I get severe upper and lower abdominal swelling, pain, nausea, low appetite, constipation, moddiness. The swelling gets so bad that my belly starts to balloon out. I need help!! I tried vitamin E and am eating tons of antioxidants for the antiinflammatory affect and can't take nsaids....so what else is there?

    • ANSWER:
      "Glutathione is the body's master antioxidant and best kept secret to maintaining health." Glutathione is a small molecule made up of three amino acids, which exists in almost every cell of the body. However, glutathione must be generated within the cell from its precursors before it can work effectively in the body. The presence of glutathione is required to maintain the normal function of the immune system. It is known to play a critical role in the multiplication of lymphocytes (the cells that mediate specific immunity), which occurs in the development of an effective immune response. Furthermore, the cells of the immune system produce many oxygen radicals as a result of their normal functioning, resulting in a need for higher concentrations of antioxidants than most cells. Glutathione plays a crucial role in fulfilling this requirement.

      Over the past thirty years, researchers have explored the role of antioxidants in good health as well as the treatment and prevention of diseases involving oxidation or fermentation by metabolic acids. Well known and widely used antioxidants such as vitamin A, vitamin E and selenium neutralize acid. They occur naturally in nature, but not in the body. They must be introduced as part of a balanced diet. Given the critical role of antioxidants in good health, it is not surprising that the body itself manufactures its own natural antioxidants. The most important of these is glutathione. Because all other antioxidants depend upon the presence of glutathione to function properly, scientists call it 'the master antioxidant. ‘Glutathione binds to toxins, forming a water-soluble complex - which is ultimately excreted in the urine or bile as waste.

  11. QUESTION:
    what pregnancy symptoms should i be aware of?
    im 6 weeks gone so far all i have is crampings and tender breast .. but so far *fingers crossed* no morning sickness.

    what other symptom should i expect in early and late pregnancy just so i can prepare myself for whats to come.

    • ANSWER:
      There are lots of symptoms that women experience in pregnancy but every woman (and every pregnancy) is different. Some women can go through their entire pregnancy feeling absolutely normal (other than a growing belly!) whereas other women suffer with severe nausea and back pain. So just because you're not experience a particular symptom, or you ar experience a symptom that someone else isn't, doesn't mean anything is wrong. I'll go through some of the main symptoms though!

      In the first trimester (weeks 1 - 12 approximately) one of the most common symptoms is morning sickness. This can start any time during the first trimester. For me, it started around week 8/9 and lasted until week 16. Morning sickness varies from woman to woman but I did not vomit, I just suffered with extreme nausea and retching that was worse in the morning but lasted all day (and night!). Tiredness is also very common in the first trimester as your body gets used to being pregnant. You may experience symptoms similar to those you had before your period was due such as cramping or sore breasts. Some women find their appetite increases, others lose their appetite totally due to morning sickness. Some women find they need to urinate more frequently. Your belly may appear bloated but in the early stages, this is due to gas and fluid retention rather than the growing baby. You may feel emotional due to the hormonal changes.

      In the second trimester (approximately weeks 12 - 28) a lot of women start to feel a bit more like their old selves. this is known as the honey mood period of pregnancy and the stage where a lot of women start to "bloom". Energy levels return to normal and for most women, morning sickness ends. I felt much better in my second trimester. I moved home, decorated, went camping, moved offices at work which I would have really struggled with in the first part of my pregnancy! Its also nice because you should start to feel the first movements of your baby somewhere between weeks 18 - 22. It only feels like a tiny butterfly in your belly at first but towards the end of your second trimester, you'll start to feel proper kicks and punches all the time!! You will also start to notice your bump growing quickly. Now is the time to buy some maternity clothes! Other people will start to notice you look pregnant too although if this is your first baby, it may not be very noticeable until later on. You may start to suffer with indigestion or heart burn and you may find your bladder feels full a lot as your baby starts to grow and put pressure on it. Like me, you may also experience back pain or sciatica caused by the baby resting on your sciatic nerve. You will find your bra size will go up. Your emotional state may have levelled out a bit by now but you may find the hormones make your sex drive increase at this stage too.

      Third Trimester (approximately weeks 28 - 40) This is a time for real growth. Expect to put on at least a stone (14lbs) in weight during this time. Your bump should be growing around a cm a week now. Tiredness is very common during this late stage of pregnancy and any symptoms such as back pain will get worse due to the growing baby and increased pressure on your body. It can also become difficult to sleep as you get bigger. You will find that tasks you used to do with ease like cleaning the house or gardening are much harder than before and tire you out quicker. Your indigestion and acid reflux may start to get worse and you may also start to get short of breath sometimes as the baby grows and puts pressure on your lungs.

      These are all really general symptoms though. Like I said, every woman and ever pregnancy is different. Congratulations though and good luck!!

  12. QUESTION:
    I want to lose weight and I feel like using diet pills?
    I want to lose weight fast and I might resort to using diet pills is that healthy?

    • ANSWER:
      Hello, my friends

      The use of diet pills has severe and often life-threatening side effects. You will need to combine three factors in order to lose weight healthy and permanently: the quality of your food combining, a routine of daily cardiovascular/physical exercises and a detoxification of your inner body.

      Wrong Food Combining = fatigue,weight gain, indigestion.

      According to expert Nutritionists:
      - You can not combine starches (bread,cereals,grains,etc) with proteins (eggs,legumes,meat,etc)
      - You can not combine proteins with fats (butter,margarine,avocado,etc) or with oils (corn, soy, sunflower,etc).
      - Avoid red meats (chicken, fish, turkey are your choices only), plantain or banana, mango.
      - Use extra virgin olive oil, brown sugar or bee honey, sea salt and integral rice/spaghetti.

      It is recommended to eat fruits 20-30 minutes before eating (empty stomach) in order to prepare the digestive system. 3 hours should elapse after eating cooked food before eating fruit again.

      Do not mix acid fruits with sweet fruits. Melon must be eaten alone.

      Cardiovascular and Physical Exercise

      A good routine including all different muscle of your body must be planned during 30-40 minutes per session, 3-4 times a week.. Assistance is helpful.

      Detoxifying your Inner Body

      Definitively, Organic Aloe Vera strengths the immune system which regulates the different functions of our human body. The immune system will allow the loss of weight of your body produced by itself after a complete detoxification of the whole digestive system as well as the circulatory system in the human body.

      Considering this detoxification will lead you to a very healthy and permanent loss of weight in a very short period of time without the risk of regaining it back.

      My best regards

      Dr Pepito
      camelot_2010@yahoo.com

  13. QUESTION:
    I know that there are quite a number of people on here and all over for that matter that are suffering from?
    stress, anxiety and depression. What I really want to know is what exactly are your physical symptoms because I have this also and would like to know if my ailments are similiar to anyone else out there, Any ans. would be greatly appreicated.

    • ANSWER:
      Depression is a disorder that affects your thoughts, moods, feelings, behavior and even your physical health. People used to think it was "all in your head" and that if you really tried, you could "snap out of it" or just "get over it." But doctors now know that depression is not a weakness, and it's not something you can treat on your own. Depression is a medical disorder with a biological and chemical basis.

      Sometimes a stressful life event triggers depression. Other times depression seems to occur spontaneously with no identifiable specific cause. Depression is much more than grieving or a bout of the blues.

      Depression may occur only once in a person's life. Often, however, it occurs as repeated episodes over a lifetime, with periods free of depression in between. Or it may be a chronic condition, requiring ongoing treatment over a lifetime.

      People of all ages and races suffer from depression. Medications are available that are generally safe and effective, even for the most severe depression. With proper treatment, most people with serious depression improve, often within weeks, and can return to normal daily activitiesTwo hallmarks of depression — symptoms key to establishing a diagnosis — are:

      Loss of interest in normal daily activities. You lose interest in or pleasure from activities that you used to enjoy.
      Depressed mood. You feel sad, helpless or hopeless, and may have crying spells.
      In addition, for a doctor or other health professional to diagnose depression, most of the following signs and symptoms also must be present for at least two weeks.

      Sleep disturbances. Sleeping too much or having problems sleeping can be a sign you're depressed. Waking in the middle of the night or early in the morning and not being able to get back to sleep are typical.
      Impaired thinking or concentration. You may have trouble concentrating or making decisions and have problems with memory.
      Changes in weight. An increased or reduced appetite and unexplained weight gain or loss may indicate depression.
      Agitation. You may seem restless, agitated, irritable and easily annoyed.
      Fatigue or slowing of body movements. You feel weariness and lack of energy nearly every day. You may feel as tired in the morning as you did when you went to bed the night before. You may feel like you're doing everything in slow motion, or you may speak in a slow, monotonous tone.
      Low self-esteem. You feel worthless and have excessive guilt.
      Less interest in sex. If you were sexually active before developing depression, you may notice a dramatic decrease in your level of interest in having sexual relations.
      Thoughts of death. You have a persistent negative view of yourself, your situation and the future. You may have thoughts of death, dying or suicide.
      Depression can also cause a wide variety of physical complaints, such as gastrointestinal problems (indigestion, constipation or diarrhea), headache and backache. Many people with depression also have symptoms of anxiety.

      Children, teens and older adults may react differently to depression. In these groups, symptoms may take different forms or may be masked by other conditions. Kids may pretend to be sick, worry that a parent is going to die, perform poorly in school, refuse to go to school, or exhibit behavioral problems. Older people may be more willing to discuss the physical manifestations of depression, instead of their emotional difficulties.

      Types of depression
      The main types of depression include:

      Major depression. This type of mood disturbance lasts more than two weeks. Symptoms may include overwhelming feelings of sadness and grief, loss of interest or pleasure in activities you usually enjoy, and feelings of worthlessness or guilt. This type of depression may result in poor sleep, a change in appetite, severe fatigue and difficulty concentrating. Severe depression may increase the risk of suicide.
      Dysthymia. Dysthymia (dis-THI-me-uh) is a less severe but more chronic form of depression. Signs and symptoms usually aren't disabling, and periods of dysthymia can alternate with short periods of feeling normal. Having dysthymia places you at an increased risk of major depression.
      Adjustment disorders. If a loved one dies, you lose your job or you receive a diagnosis of cancer, it's perfectly normal to feel tense, sad, overwhelmed or angry. Eventually, most people come to terms with the lasting consequences of life stresses, but some don't. This is what's known as an adjustment disorder — when your response to a stressful event or situation causes signs and symptoms of depression. Some people develop an adjustment disorder in response to a single event. In others, it stems from a combination of stressors. Adjustment disorders can be acute (lasting less than six months) or chronic (lasting longer). Doctors classify adjustment disorders based on the primary signs and symptoms of depression or anxiety.
      Bipolar disorder. Having recurrent episodes of depression and elation (mania) is characteristic of bipolar disorder. Because this condition involves emotions at both extremes (poles), it's called bipolar disorder or manic-depressive disorder. Mania affects your judgment, causing you to make unwise decisions. Some people have bursts of increased creativity and productivity during the manic phase. The number of episodes at either extreme may not be equal. Some people may have several episodes of depression before having another manic phase, or vice versa.
      Seasonal affective disorder. Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a pattern of depression related to changes in seasons and a lack of exposure to sunlight. It may cause headaches, irritability and a low energy level.

  14. QUESTION:
    How do u know if u are going through depression?
    I mean I'm sure everybody has their really sad days..and it might continue for a while...but how would you know if u are going through "depression" without going to c a doctor?

    • ANSWER:
      Depression- Signs and symptoms

      Two hallmarks of depression — symptoms key to establishing a diagnosis — are:

      Loss of interest in normal daily activities. You lose interest in or pleasure from activities that you used to enjoy.

      Depressed mood. You feel sad, helpless or hopeless, and may have crying spells.

      In addition, for a doctor or other health professional to diagnose depression, most of the following signs and symptoms also must be present for at least two weeks.

      Sleep disturbances. Sleeping too much or having problems sleeping can be a sign you're depressed. Waking in the middle of the night or early in the morning and not being able to get back to sleep are typical.
      Impaired thinking or concentration. You may have trouble concentrating or making decisions and have problems with memory.

      Changes in weight. An increased or reduced appetite and unexplained weight gain or loss may indicate depression.
      Agitation. You may seem restless, agitated, irritable and easily annoyed.

      Fatigue or slowing of body movements. You feel weariness and lack of energy nearly every day. You may feel as tired in the morning as you did when you went to bed the night before. You may feel like you're doing everything in slow motion, or you may speak in a slow, monotonous tone.
      Low self-esteem. You feel worthless and have excessive guilt.

      Thoughts of death. You have a persistent negative view of yourself, your situation and the future. You may have thoughts of death, dying or suicide.

      Depression can also cause a wide variety of physical complaints, such as gastrointestinal problems (indigestion, constipation or diarrhea), headache and backache. Many people with depression also have symptoms of anxiety.

      Children, teens and older adults may react differently to depression. In these groups, symptoms may take different forms or may be masked by other conditions. Kids may pretend to be sick, worry that a parent is going to die, perform poorly in school, refuse to go to school, or exhibit behavioral problems. Older people may be more willing to discuss the physical manifestations of depression, instead of their emotional difficulties.

      Types of depression

      The main types of depression include:

      Major depression. This type of mood disturbance lasts more than two weeks. Symptoms may include overwhelming feelings of sadness and grief, loss of interest or pleasure in activities you usually enjoy, and feelings of worthlessness or guilt. This type of depression may result in poor sleep, a change in appetite, severe fatigue and difficulty concentrating. Severe depression may increase the risk of suicide.

      Dysthymia. Dysthymia (dis-THI-me-uh) is a less severe but more chronic form of depression. Signs and symptoms usually aren't disabling, and periods of dysthymia can alternate with short periods of feeling normal. Having dysthymia places you at an increased risk of major depression.

      Adjustment disorders. If a loved one dies, you lose your job or you receive a diagnosis of cancer, it's perfectly normal to feel tense, sad, overwhelmed or angry. Eventually, most people come to terms with the lasting consequences of life stresses, but some don't. This is what's known as an adjustment disorder — when your response to a stressful event or situation causes signs and symptoms of depression. Some people develop an adjustment disorder in response to a single event. In others, it stems from a combination of stressors. Adjustment disorders can be acute (lasting less than six months) or chronic (lasting longer). Doctors classify adjustment disorders based on the primary signs and symptoms of depression or anxiety.

      Bipolar disorder. Having recurrent episodes of depression and elation (mania) is characteristic of bipolar disorder. Because this condition involves emotions at both extremes (poles), it's called bipolar disorder or manic-depressive disorder. Mania affects your judgment, causing you to make unwise decisions. Some people have bursts of increased creativity and productivity during the manic phase. The number of episodes at either extreme may not be equal. Some people may have several episodes of depression before having another manic phase, or vice versa.

      Seasonal affective disorder. Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a pattern of depression related to changes in seasons and a lack of exposure to sunlight. It may cause headaches, irritability and a low energy level.

  15. QUESTION:
    Does anyone take Zopliclone? What side effects do you get?
    I think thats how you spell it anyway. But do any of you have any weird psychological side ffects after taking it? I get all weird and paranoid and start talking more do you find this?

    • ANSWER:
      Zopiclone(ZOP-i-klone) belongs to the group of medicines called central nervous system (CNS) depressants (medicines that make you drowsy or less alert). This medicine is used to treat insomnia (trouble in sleeping). Zopiclone helps you get to sleep faster and sleep through the night. In general, when sleep medicines are used every night for a long time, they may lose their effectiveness. In most cases, sleep medicines should be used only for short periods of time, such as 1 or 2 days, and
      generally for no longer than 1 or 2 week

      Side Effects of This Medicine

      Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

      Check with your doctor as soon as possible if any of the following side effects occur:

      More common

      confusion-more common in older adults; clumsiness or unsteadiness-more common in older adults; daytime anxiety and/or restlessness; difficulty with coordination-more common in older adults; mood or mental changes

      Less common

      Drowsiness (severe); shortness of breath; difficult or labored breathing; tightness in chest; wheezing; skin rash; aggressiveness; behavior changes

      Rare

      Memory problems-more common in older patients; behavior or mental changes

      Symptoms of overdose

      Get emergency help immediately if any of the following symptoms of overdose occur

      Clumsiness; unsteadiness; mental or mood changes; drowsiness (severe); unusual tiredness or weakness; sluggishness; reduced physical activity; unusual sleepiness; loss of consciousness

      Other side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. However, check with your doctor if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome.

      More common

      Dizziness; Dryness of mouth; heartburn; impaired vision; increased appetite; indigestion; loss of appetite-more common in older adults; stomach upset; difficulty speaking; constipation; decreased muscle tone; weight loss

      Less common

      Agitation-more common in older adults; chills; fast, irregular, or pounding heartbeat-more common in older adults; feeling of heaviness of arms and legs; increase in the amount of saliva-more common in older adults; increased sweating-more common in older adults; tingling, burning or prickly sensation; trembling and shaking of fingers, hands, arms, feet, or legs-more common in older adults; vomiting-more common in older adults

      After you stop using this medicine, your body may need time to adjust. The length of time this takes depends on the amount of medicine you were using and how long you used it. During this time check with your doctor if you notice any of the following side effects:

      Abdominal or stomach cramps or pain; nausea; vomiting; more difficulty in sleeping than before treatment; muscle cramps or discomfort; anxiety; nervousness; irritability; restlessness; increased sweating; tremors; seizures

      Zopiclone may cause you to have a coated tongue, bad breath, or a bitter taste. These effects are to be expected when you are taking this medicine.

      Other side effects not listed above may also occur in some patients. If you notice any other effects, check with your doctor.

  16. QUESTION:
    My son was given depakote today to help deal with his depression and mood swings..?
    I am curious how long it will take to see results. He is only 11 years old and this is very scary for me as a mom. He has been very sad and crying a lot for a while. It got so bad he wont even go to school now because he cant hold back the tears any longer. I am working with him on all of his school work at home for a while untill things get back to normal again.

    • ANSWER:
      11 is a very young age to be diagnosed with bipolar disorder. Bipolar disorder doesn't usually manifest until sexual maturity. Was he assessed by a paediatrician, or child psychologist? I'd get a second opinion, preferably from a psychologist, (they don't prescribe, so are less influenced by hype from the drug co. reps), and check out depakote at www.drugs.com My standard post follows; then side effects of depakote. See bipolar disorder, at http://www.ezy-build.net.nz/~shaneris in section 10. Bipolar usually involves major moodswings, which occur without apparent cause, and often over months, rather than days, as with most people (unless rapid cycling). I'd try the Lithium Orotate, enhanced with Folic acid, and take 4 Omega 3 fish oil supplements daily, replacing 2 of them with cod liver oil supplements in the winter months, and see how that goes, over several weeks, and maintaining the treatments for the depressive phase, in section 2. If not considerably improved (or at least comparable with your present condition) consult your primary mental health care provider. If bipolar type 1, an antipsychotic is also required. If you are happy with your current situation, add the Omega 3, for other health benefits: see www.mercola.com TASKBAR. Side Effects of This Medicine

      Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

      Check with your doctor as soon as possible if any of the following side effects occur:

      More common

      body aches or pain ; congestion; cough; dryness or soreness of throat; fever ; hoarseness runny nose; tender, swollen glands in neck ; trouble in swallowing; voice changes

      Less common

      Abdominal or stomach cramps (severe); behavioral, mood, or mental changes; blurred vision;; confusion; ; continuous, uncontrolled back-and-forth and/or rolling eye movements; earache, redness or swelling in ear; dizziness,; double vision; faintness, or light-headedness when getting up from a lying or sitting position suddenly; sweating; unusual tiredness or weakness; fast, irregular, pounding, or racing heartbeat or pulse; heavy, nonmenstrual vaginal bleeding; increase in seizures; loss of appetite; nausea or vomiting (continuing); rapid weight gain; spots before eyes; swelling of face, arms, hands, lower legs, or feet; tingling of hands or feet; tiredness and weakness; unusual bleeding or bruising; unusual weight gain or loss; vomiting of blood or material that looks like coffee grounds; yellow eyes or skin

      Other side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. However, check with your doctor if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome:

      More common

      Abdominal or stomach cramps (mild); acid or sour stomach; belching; heartburn; indigestion; stomach discomfort, upset or pain; change in menstrual periods; crying paranoia; quick to react or overreact emotionally; rapidly changing moods; depersonalization; dysphoria; diarrhea; euphoria; hair loss; indigestion; lack or loss of strength; loss of appetite; loss of bowel control; mental depression; nausea and vomiting; paranoia; quick to react or overreact emotionally; rapidly changing moods; sleepiness or unusual drowsiness; trembling of hands and arms; unusual weight loss or gain

      Less common or rare

      Absence of or decrease in body movement; absent, missed, or irregular menstrual periods; stopping of menstrual bleeding; anxiety; nervousness; restlessness; bloated full feeling; bloody or cloudy urine; bloody nose; bruising; burning, crawling, itching, numbness, prickling, "pins and needles" , or tingling feelings; burning, dry or itching eyes; change in taste; chills; clumsiness or unsteadiness; coin-shaped lesions on skin; cold sweats; confusion; constipation; cramps; decreased awareness or responsiveness; degenerative disease of the joint; difficult, burning, or painful urination; difficulty in moving; discharge; excessive tearing of eye; discouragement; dizziness; drowsiness; dry mouth; excess air or gas in stomach or intestines; excessive muscle tone; muscle tension or tightness; muscle stiffness; feeling of constant movement of self or surroundings; feeling sad or empty; feeling of warmth or heat; ; flushing or redness of skin, especially on face and neck; frequent urge to urinate; headache; heavy bleeding; irregular heartbeats; irritability; joint pain; swollen joints; lack of appetite; lip smacking ; uncontrolled chewing movements; loss of hair; loss of interest or pleasure; loss of memory; problems with memory; mimicry of speech or movements; muscle aching or cramping; muscle pains or stiffness; mutism; negativism; normal menstrual bleeding occurring earlier, possibly lasting longer than expected; pain; passing gas; peculiar postures or movements, mannerisms or grimacing; puffing of cheeks; rapid or worm-like movements of tongue; redness, swelling, or soreness of tongue; severe sleepiness; shortness of breath; difficult or labored breathing; small red or purple spots on skin; stuffy nose; runny nose; sneezing; redness, pain, swelling of eye, eyelid, or inner lining of eyelid; seeing, hearing, or feeling things that are not there; sensation of spinning; shaking; shortness of breath; hyperventilation; skin rash; sweating; tightness in chest; tiredness; trouble concentrating; trouble in speaking; slurred speech; trouble sleeping; uncontrolled chewing movements; uncontrolled movements of arms and legs; unusual excitement, restlessness, or irritability; wheezing

  17. QUESTION:
    When did you get your period?
    I'm 13 yrs old and i'm still waiting for my period. All my friends (except 1) had theirs but i still haven't gotten mine. What are some signs that i'm getting mine? When and where did you get your and how was it?

    • ANSWER:
      I was pretty anxious to get mine at 13 too, and I didn't get it until right before I turned 14. It will come, and you may or may not get symptoms. Mine showed up as a random brown/reddish stain in my panties one day. I had no idea it was going to come that day, and it was kind of unfortunate that my body picked that day for that deed (it was right before I was going to go to the movies with some friends). You may get cramps (pain in the lower abdomen or lower back), bloating, irritability (ranging from slight annoyed-ness to total girlzilla), tiredness, changes in appetite, slight cravings, acne breakouts, breast tenderness, and gas or indigestion. Usually symptoms aren't severe at all before your first period, and most of the time you don't get any super noticeable symptoms, and your period just shows up.
      A lot of girls want to get theirs, and I wonder why. Your period isn't fun. You get all bloated and upset and blood coming out of... you know where isn't enjoyable, it's just kinda gross. I highly recommend using tampons. Do not be afraid of the mighty tampon. Once you get the hang of them, they're easy to put in and you don't have to worry about feeling like you've wet your panties. Pads are ok, but tampons are stress free and easy.
      Good luck! Enjoy your time without Aunt Flo, she's the black, or should I say red sheep in the family if you know what I mean...
      Sincerely,
      Me

  18. QUESTION:
    How do you know if your sinking into depression?

    • ANSWER:
      Bonjour madam

      Signs and symptoms
      Two hallmarks of depression — symptoms key to establishing a diagnosis — are:

      Loss of interest in normal daily activities. You lose interest in or pleasure from activities that you used to enjoy.
      Depressed mood. You feel sad, helpless or hopeless, and may have crying spells.
      In addition, for a doctor or other health professional to diagnose depression, most of the following signs and symptoms also must be present for at least two weeks.

      Sleep disturbances. Sleeping too much or having problems sleeping can be a sign you're depressed. Waking in the middle of the night or early in the morning and not being able to get back to sleep are typical.
      Impaired thinking or concentration. You may have trouble concentrating or making decisions and have problems with memory.
      Changes in weight. An increased or reduced appetite and unexplained weight gain or loss may indicate depression.
      Agitation. You may seem restless, agitated, irritable and easily annoyed.
      Fatigue or slowing of body movements. You feel weariness and lack of energy nearly every day. You may feel as tired in the morning as you did when you went to bed the night before. You may feel like you're doing everything in slow motion, or you may speak in a slow, monotonous tone.
      Low self-esteem. You feel worthless and have excessive guilt.
      Less interest in sex. If you were sexually active before developing depression, you may notice a dramatic decrease in your level of interest in having sexual relations.
      Thoughts of death. You have a persistent negative view of yourself, your situation and the future. You may have thoughts of death, dying or suicide.
      Depression can also cause a wide variety of physical complaints, such as gastrointestinal problems (indigestion, constipation or diarrhea), headache and backache. Many people with depression also have symptoms of anxiety.

      Children, teens and older adults may react differently to depression. In these groups, symptoms may take different forms or may be masked by other conditions. Kids may pretend to be sick, worry that a parent is going to die, perform poorly in school, refuse to go to school, or exhibit behavioral problems. Older people may be more willing to discuss the physical manifestations of depression, instead of their emotional difficulties.

      Types of depression
      The main types of depression include:

      Major depression. This type of mood disturbance lasts more than two weeks. Symptoms may include overwhelming feelings of sadness and grief, loss of interest or pleasure in activities you usually enjoy, and feelings of worthlessness or guilt. This type of depression may result in poor sleep, a change in appetite, severe fatigue and difficulty concentrating. Severe depression may increase the risk of suicide.
      Dysthymia. Dysthymia (dis-THI-me-uh) is a less severe but more chronic form of depression. Signs and symptoms usually aren't disabling, and periods of dysthymia can alternate with short periods of feeling normal. Having dysthymia places you at an increased risk of major depression.
      Adjustment disorders. If a loved one dies, you lose your job or you receive a diagnosis of cancer, it's perfectly normal to feel tense, sad, overwhelmed or angry. Eventually, most people come to terms with the lasting consequences of life stresses, but some don't. This is what's known as an adjustment disorder — when your response to a stressful event or situation causes signs and symptoms of depression. Some people develop an adjustment disorder in response to a single event. In others, it stems from a combination of stressors. Adjustment disorders can be acute (lasting less than six months) or chronic (lasting longer). Doctors classify adjustment disorders based on the primary signs and symptoms of depression or anxiety.
      Bipolar disorder. Having recurrent episodes of depression and elation (mania) is characteristic of bipolar disorder. Because this condition involves emotions at both extremes (poles), it's called bipolar disorder or manic-depressive disorder. Mania affects your judgment, causing you to make unwise decisions. Some people have bursts of increased creativity and productivity during the manic phase. The number of episodes at either extreme may not be equal. Some people may have several episodes of depression before having another manic phase, or vice versa.
      Seasonal affective disorder. Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a pattern of depression related to changes in seasons and a lack of exposure to sunlight. It may cause headaches, irritability and a low energy level.

      Just keep the mind occupied and you wont be depressed, do sports and keep bussy most importantly, exercise helps,

      dont eat too much, i used to do that when i was young and m mum used to leave for paris and left me on my own here

      good luck madam

      aurevoir

  19. QUESTION:
    very close to anaemia, please help me?
    Vegetarian for 3 years now.. I have an iron deficiency (even did when I ate meat) but I have been okay up until recently...about 6 months ago, even though I eat well, I started to feel weak, tired, dark circles under eyes etc. Now i have got some bruises on my arms and I cannot remember where I got them. My aunt said you get bruises in the last stage before anaemia and that I must go to my doctor for an iron injection next week.
    Just wondering, is there a way to make this not happen again? Foods I can eat to help with my iron? I am scared that this might lead to me becoming sterile or worse but i stand by my values and will NOT eat meat ever again. Even if my diet has to consist or lentils and chickpeas solely.

    • ANSWER:
      Eat plenty of green leafy veggies.
      It is lack of Iron and there are other things other than meat you can eat
      Anaemia is a condition where the amount of haemoglobin in the blood is below the normal level, or there are fewer red blood cells than normal.

      There are several different types of anaemia and each one has a different cause, although iron deficiency anaemia is the most common type.

      Other forms of anaemia can be caused by a lack of vitamin B12 or folate in the body. Read more about vitamin B12 and folate deficiency anaemia.

      Symptoms of iron deficiency anaemia
      The main symptoms of iron deficiency anaemia are tiredness and lethargy (lack of energy). Other symptoms include:

      •shortness of breath (dyspnoea)
      •changes in your appearance, such as a pale complexion and dry nails
      Speak to your GP if you notice any of these symptoms. They will be able to diagnose iron deficiency anaemia with a simple blood test.

      However, in most cases there won't be any symptoms at all, particularly if the cause is a slow loss of blood.

      What causes iron deficiency anaemia?
      Iron deficiency anaemia occurs when there isn't enough iron in the body. Iron is found in meat, dried fruit and some vegetables. Iron is used by the body to make haemoglobin, which helps store and carry oxygen in red blood cells.

      This means if there is a lack of iron in the blood, organs and tissues will not get as much oxygen as they usually do.

      There are many conditions that can lead to a lack of iron. In men, and post-menopausal women the most common cause is bleeding in the stomach and intestines. This can be caused by:

      •non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)
      •a peptic ulcer
      •stomach cancer or bowel cancer
      In women of reproductive age, the most common causes of iron deficiency anaemia are:

      •heavy periods
      •pregnancy - because your body needs extra iron for your baby
      Read more about the causes of iron deficiency anaemia.

      Treating iron deficiency anaemia
      Treatment for iron deficiency anaemia involves taking iron supplements to boost the low levels of iron in the body. This is usually effective and the condition rarely causes complications.

      You will need to be monitored every few months to check the treatment is working and your iron levels have returned to normal.

      The underlying cause will also need to be treated so anaemia does not come back.

      Read more about how iron deficiency is treated.

      Iron-rich foods
      Foods that contain iron include:

      •dark-green leafy vegetables, such as watercress and curly kale
      •beans
      •nuts
      •meat
      •dried fruit
      Some foods and medicines can make it harder for your body to absorb iron. These may include:

      •tea and coffee
      •calcium, found in dairy products such as milk
      •antacids (medication to help relieve indigestion)
      Complications
      If iron deficiency anaemia is left untreated it can make you more susceptible to illness and infection, as a lack of iron in the body affects your immune system (the body’s natural defence system).

      Severe iron deficiency anaemia may increase the risk of developing complications that affect the heart or lungs such as:

      •tachycardia (an abnormally fast heartbeat)
      •heart failure, when your heart is not pumping blood around your body very efficiently
      Pregnant women also have a higher risk of complications before and after birth.

      Read more about the complications of iron deficiency anaemia.

      Dune

  20. QUESTION:
    i dont know if im depressed or just upset. anyone know anything?
    iv been trying to figure out if im depressed. i dont think i have any reason to be but sometimes i get very down. i hate my high school and i hate home. the only place im happy is with my friends but even still i get upset when im with them and either dont show it or just automatically suppress my feelings without even trying. i have a few suicidal tendencies. i try to talk to my friends but they have their own problems and i am forced to help them instead. I've harmed my self a few times when im really upset. but i still dont feel im depressed because in public i tend to act happy without trying almost as if i am happy but the second i am alone i want to fall on the floor and cry. someone just tell me am i being a teenager or is there something wrong with me?

    • ANSWER:
      Sorry. That must be hard. You do sound depressed though. A lot of people , and I mean A LOT of people try to hide their feelings. They call these people "stuffers." Short term gain, Long tem pain. I am also very concerned about your "suicidal tendencies." People that are depressed tend to have that kind of behavior if it is severe.Depression is a disorder that affects your thoughts, moods, feelings, behavior and even your physical health. People used to think it was "all in your head" and that if you really tried, you could "snap out of it" or just "get over it." But doctors now know that depression is not a weakness, and it's not something you can treat on your own. Depression is a medical disorder with a biological and chemical basis.

      Sometimes a stressful life event triggers depression. Other times depression seems to occur spontaneously with no identifiable specific cause. Depression is much more than grieving or a bout of the blues.

      Depression may occur only once in a person's life. Often, however, it occurs as repeated episodes over a lifetime, with periods free of depression in between. Or it may be a chronic condition, requiring ongoing treatment over a lifetime.

      People of all ages and races suffer from depression. Medications are available that are generally safe and effective, even for the most severe depression. With proper treatment, most people with serious depression improve, often within weeks, and can return to normal daily activities.

      **Two hallmarks of depression — symptoms key to establishing a diagnosis — are

      -Loss of interest in normal daily activities. You lose interest in or pleasure from activities that you used to enjoy.

      -Depressed mood. You feel sad, helpless or hopeless, and may have crying spells.

      In addition, for a doctor or other health professional to diagnose depression, most of the following signs and symptoms also must be present for at least two weeks.

      Sleep disturbances. Sleeping too much or having problems sleeping can be a sign you're depressed. Waking in the middle of the night or early in the morning and not being able to get back to sleep are typical.
      Impaired thinking or concentration. You may have trouble concentrating or making decisions and have problems with memory.
      Changes in weight. An increased or reduced appetite and unexplained weight gain or loss may indicate depression.
      Agitation. You may seem restless, agitated, irritable and easily annoyed.
      Fatigue or slowing of body movements. You feel weariness and lack of energy nearly every day. You may feel as tired in the morning as you did when you went to bed the night before. You may feel like you're doing everything in slow motion, or you may speak in a slow, monotonous tone.
      Low self-esteem. You feel worthless and have excessive guilt.
      Less interest in sex. If you were sexually active before developing depression, you may notice a dramatic decrease in your level of interest in having sexual relations.
      Thoughts of death. You have a persistent negative view of yourself, your situation and the future. You may have thoughts of death, dying or suicide.
      Depression can also cause a wide variety of physical complaints, such as gastrointestinal problems (indigestion, constipation or diarrhea), headache and backache. Many people with depression also have symptoms of anxiety.

      Children, teens and older adults may react differently to depression. In these groups, symptoms may take different forms or may be masked by other conditions. Kids may pretend to be sick, worry that a parent is going to die, perform poorly in school, refuse to go to school, or exhibit behavioral problems. Older people may be more willing to discuss the physical manifestations of depression, instead of their emotional difficulties.

      Types of depression
      The main types of depression include:

      Major depression. This type of mood disturbance lasts more than two weeks. Symptoms may include overwhelming feelings of sadness and grief, loss of interest or pleasure in activities you usually enjoy, and feelings of worthlessness or guilt. This type of depression may result in poor sleep, a change in appetite, severe fatigue and difficulty concentrating. Severe depression may increase the risk of suicide.

      If you show little interest in once-enjoyable activities, if you feel sad, helpless, tired or worthless, and if your eating and sleeping habits have changed greatly, see your doctor to determine if you have depression.

      Depression is a serious illness that can take a terrible toll on individuals and families. Untreated, depression can lead to a downward spiral of disability, dependency and suicide. Women attempt suicide more often than men do, but men are much more likely to succeed in killing themselves. The rate of suicide is four times greater for men. Men over 70 are the most likely to commit suicide.

      Certain warning signs may indicate serious depression and the possibility of suicide. Take any threat of suicide seriously, even if the person is already being treated for depression. If you see any of the following danger signs, call a doctor, mental health clinic or suicide hot line immediately:

      -Pacing, agitated behavior, frequent mood changes and sleeplessness for several nights
      -Actions or threats of assault, physical harm or violence
      -Threats or talk of death or suicide, such as "I don't care anymore," or "You won't need to worry about me much longer"
      -Withdrawal from activities and relationships
      -Putting affairs in order, such as saying goodbye to friends, giving away prized possessions or writing a will
      -A sudden brightening of mood after a period of being depressed
      -Unusually risky behavior, such as buying or handling a gun or driving recklessly

      I would definetely seek some treatment, before it gets worse, believe me, it will sooner or later creep up on you when you think you are happy.

      Alot of "teens" express anger , but it really is depression. They are scared, or embarrased, but I would talk to somebody.

      Treatment: Therapy or Medications. Or both....most effective.

      Take Care!!!

      Self-help organizations have become potent allies for people who are coping with mental illness or who care about someone with such an illness. For depression or other mental illnesses, self-help groups include:

      National Mental Health Association (NMHA): (800) 969-6642; or, in a crisis: (800) SUICIDE (784-2433)
      National Alliance for the Mentally Ill (NAMI): (800) 950-6264
      Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance: (800) 826-3632

  21. QUESTION:
    Stomache ache on the left side?
    I have a dull pain in my lower abdomen. It feels like ovulation but its lasted more than 2 days now. I have IUD but wondering if it has failed or smth is wrong. any bright ideas before I go to the hospital?

    • ANSWER:
      Abdominal/pelvic pain that is similar to that of period cramping may indicate a problem in a reproductive organ (like the pain around your ovaries or uterus).

      This includes conditions such as endometriosis (when tissue from the uterus is displaced to somewhere else like the pelvic wall or ovaries), uterine fibroids (thick bands of muscular and fibrous tissue in the uterus), ovarian cysts, ovarian cancer (rare), or pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) infection of the reproductive organs, usually from a sexually transmitted disease.

      If you have pain in your ovary area, you might have an ovarian cyst. I have experienced that same type of pain whenever I have had an ovarian cyst. I was also diagnosed with endometriosis in 2007 which caused me severe pelvic pain and intense and painful period cramping.

      If a gynaecological reason cannot be found for the pain you are experiencing, then it could be a gastroenterology problem which could be caused by excessive gas, chronic constipation, viral gastroenteritis (stomach flu), IBS (Irritable bowel syndrome), heartburn or indigestion, gastroesophageal reflux, ulcers, cholecystitis (inflammation of the gallbladder) with or without gallstones, appendicitis (inflammation of the appendix), diverticular disease, including inflammation of small pouches that form in the large intestines (diverticulitis), bowel obstruction (in addition to pain, this causes nausea, bloating, vomiting, and inability to pass gas or stool), food allergies, food poisoning (salmonella, shigella), hernia, kidney stones, UTI’s (urinary tract infections), pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas) or dissecting abdominal aortic aneurysm (bleeding into the wall of the aorta).

      Based on your symptoms and what you wrote, I would recommend that you should see your doctor/gynaecologist, and if nothing is found that you see a gastroenterologist just to rule out any serious GI causes.

      Good luck :)

  22. QUESTION:
    What is this pill used for-and any side affects?
    It is called Depakote

    • ANSWER:
      Depakote, in both delayed-release tablet and capsule form, is used to treat certain types of seizures and convulsions. It may be prescribed alone or with other epilepsy medications.
      The delayed-release tablets are also used to control the manic episodes--periods of abnormally high spirits and energy--that occur in bipolar disorder (manic depression).

      An extended-release form of this drug, Depakote ER, is prescribed to prevent migraine headaches. The delayed-release tablets are also used for this purpose.

      Common Side Effects:

      Check with your doctor if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome:

      Abdominal or stomach cramps (mild); change in menstrual periods; diarrhea; hair loss; indigestion; loss of appetite; nausea and vomiting; trembling of hands and arms; unusual weight loss or gain

      Less Common Side Effects:

      Check with your doctor if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome:

      Clumsiness or unsteadiness; constipation; dizziness; drowsiness; headache; skin rash; unusual excitement, restlessness, or irritability

      Always Notify Doctor:

      Less Common: Abdominal or stomach cramps (severe); behavioral, mood, or mental changes; continuous, uncontrolled back-and-forth and/or rolling eye movements; double vision; increase in seizures; loss of appetite; nausea or vomiting (continuing); spots before eyes; swelling of face; tiredness and weakness; unusual bleeding or bruising; yellow eyes or skin

      Depakote can cause serious or even fatal liver damage, especially during the first 6 months of treatment. Children under 2 years of age are the most vulnerable, especially if they are also taking other anticonvulsant medicines and have certain other disorders such as mental retardation. The risk of liver damage decreases with age; but you should always be alert for the following symptoms: loss of seizure control, weakness, dizziness, drowsiness, a general feeling of ill health, facial swelling, loss of appetite, vomiting, and yellowing of the skin and eyes. If you suspect a liver problem, call your doctor immediately.

      Depakote has also been known to cause life-threatening damage to the pancreas. This problem can surface at any time, even after years of treatment. Call your doctor immediately if you develop any of the following warning signs: abdominal pain, loss of appetite, nausea, or vomiting.

  23. QUESTION:
    why do my ovaries hurt but i have no cramps?
    i started birth control recently because i had super bad cramps before...now on birth control i dont have cramps but my ovaries hurt like crap all the time!! what do i do? or is this normal? could something be wrong?
    it may not be my ovaries.. i just know my lower abdomen hurts on both sides

    • ANSWER:
      Abdominal/pelvic pain that is similar to that of period cramping may indicate a problem in a reproductive organ (like the pain around your ovaries or uterus).

      This includes conditions such as endometriosis (when tissue from the uterus is displaced to somewhere else like the pelvic wall or ovaries), uterine fibroids (thick bands of muscular and fibrous tissue in the uterus), ovarian cysts, ovarian cancer (rare), or pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) infection of the reproductive organs, usually from a sexually transmitted disease.

      If you have pain in your ovary area, you might have an ovarian cyst. I have experienced that same type of pain whenever I have had an ovarian cyst. I was also diagnosed with endometriosis last year which caused me severe pelvic pain and intense and painful period cramping.

      If a gynaecological reason cannot be found for the pain you are experiencing, then it could be a gastroenterology problem which could be caused by excessive gas, chronic constipation, viral gastroenteritis (stomach flu), IBS (Irritable bowel syndrome), heartburn or indigestion, gastroesophageal reflux, ulcers, cholecystitis (inflammation of the gallbladder) with or without gallstones, appendicitis (inflammation of the appendix), diverticular disease, including inflammation of small pouches that form in the large intestines (diverticulitis), bowel obstruction (in addition to pain, this causes nausea, bloating, vomiting, and inability to pass gas or stool), food allergies, food poisoning (salmonella, shigella), hernia, kidney stones, UTI’s (urinary tract infections), pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas) or dissecting abdominal aortic aneurysm (bleeding into the wall of the aorta).

      Based on your symptoms and what you wrote, I would recommend that you should see your doctor/gynaecologist, and if nothing is found that you see a gastroenterologist just to rule out any serious GI causes.

      Good luck :)

  24. QUESTION:
    how to cure an insomia in the most effective ways?

    • ANSWER:
      Try the Natural Cure. Every thing is listed in detail so that you know it better.

      Insomnia or sleeplessness has assumed alarming proportions in present times, especially among the upper classes in urban areas. This is evident from the wide range of medication for this condition prescribed by physicians and sold by chemists. Instances of persons taking an overdose of sleeping pills with fatal results are quite frequent. Insomnia deprives a person of mental rest and thereby interferes with his activities in the daytime. It constitutes a severe health hazard when it becomes a habit.

      Sleep is a periodic state of rest for the body which is absolutely essential for its efficient functioning. Sleep gives relief from tension, rests the brain and body and a person wakes up in the morning fresh and relaxed after sleep. The amount of sleep, however, varies within very wide limits from individual to individual. Normally, 7-8 hours of sleep every night is adequate for most people. Some, however, do well with four to five hours because their sleep is deeper and more refreshing.

      Insomnia is common among the elderly for a variety of reasons. The sleep of the elderly is often punctuated by brief periods of wakefulness during the night. In such cases it is the quality rather than the quantity which is most affected. With age, there is gradual reduction of periods of deep sleep. The older person, therefore, gets roused easier. Sleep requirements also diminish with ageing. From 9 hours of sleep per night at the age of 12 the average sleep needs decrease to 8 hours at the age of 20, seven hours at 40, 6-1/2 hours at 60, and 6 hours at 80.

      Symptoms: The signs of pathological insomnia are dramatic changes in the duration and quality of sleep, persistent changes in sleep patterns, lapses of memory, and lack of concentration during the day. Other symptoms are emotional instability, loss of coordination, confusion, and a lingering feeling of indifference.

      Causes: The most common cause of sleeplessness is mental tension brought about by anxiety, worries, overwork, and overexcitement. Suppressed feelings of resentment, anger and bitterness may also cause insomnia. Constipation, dyspepsia, over-eating at night, excessive intake of tea or coffee, and going to bed hungry are among the other causes. Smoking is another unsuspected cause of insomnia as it irritates the nervous system, especially the nerves of the digestive system. Often, worrying about falling asleep is enough to keep one awake.

      The Cure: Sleeping pills are no remedy for sleeplessness. They are habit forming and become less effective when taken continuously. They lower the I.Q., dull the brain and can prove fatal if taken in excess or before or after alcohol. The side-effects of sleeping pills include indigestion, skin rashes, lowered resistance to infection, circulatory and respiratory problems, poor appetite, high blood pressure, kidney and liver problems and mental confusion.

      To overcome the problem, one should adhere to a regular sleeping schedule, going to bed at a fixed time each night and getting up at a fixed time each morning. Early to bed and early to rise is a good rule. Two hours of sleep before midnight are more beneficial than four after. It is sheer folly for students, at examination times, to keep awake till long after midnight, drinking one cup of tea after another, as that is only apt to cause blackness and inability to concentrate in the examination hall.

      Research has shown that people with chronic insomnia almost invariably marked deficiencies of such key nutrients as B-complex vitamins, and vitamin C and D as also calcium, magnesium, manganese, potassium, and zinc. The sleep mechanism is unable to function efficiently unless each of these nutrients is present in adequate amounts in the diet.

      A balanced diet with simple modifications in the eating pattern will go a long way in the treatment and cure of insomnia. Such a diet should exclude white flour products, sugar and its products, tea, coffee, chocolate, cola drinks, alcohol, fatty foods, fried foods, foods containing additives, that is chemicals for preserving, colouring and flavouring, excessive use of salt, and strong condiments.

      In the modified eating pattern, breakfast should consist of fresh and dried fruits, whole cereals, seeds and yogurt. Of the two main meals, one should consist of a large mixed salad and the other should be protein-based. A cup of milk sweetened with honey at bedtime is helpful as the amino-acid tryptophan contained in milk induces sleep.

      Sleep is often elusive. Any attempt to force it only drives it further away. It is better to divert the mind with soft music or light reading. While going to bed, visualise a blank black wall occupying the entire field of vision. Turn your thoughts to light and cheerful matters. Use light bed clothes and relax. Do not lie on your back, put on your side with one or both knees brought well up and the head and shoulders slightly forward. During the night, the position of the arms and legs should be changed frequently and a healthy sleeper usually shifts from one side to the other several times in the course of the night.

      Controlled breathing is also a great help in inducing sleep. The method is to lie on your side in bed, and then take three deep breaths expanding the abdomen completely. Then hold your breath as long as you can. Next, take three more breaths and repeat the breath holding. While you hold your breath, carbon dioxide accumulates in the body and induces natural sleep. Regular, active exercising during the day and mild exercise at bedtime enhances the quantity and the quality of sleep. Exercise stimulates the elimination of lactic acid from the body which correlates with stress and muscular tension. Regular exercise also produces hormonal changes which are beneficial to the body and to the sleep pattern. Walking, jogging, skipping, swimming are all ideal exercises. Vigorous exercise should, however, be avoided at night as this can be over-stimulating.

      Yogasanas: Yoga helps a majority of cases of insomnia in two ways. Firstly, yoga treatment helps tone up the glandular, respiratory, and nervous system. Secondly, yoga also gives physical and mental relaxation as a safety value for one’s disturbing problems. The traditional yogasanas which are effective for insomnia patients are shirsana, sarvangasana, paschimottanasana, uttanasan, viparitakarni and shavasana.

      Hydrotherapy is also effective in treatment of insomnia. Application of hot packs to the spine before retiring, hot fomentation to the spine, hot footbath, or an alternate hot and cold footbath at bedtime are all time tested methods. The cold hip bath with the feet in hot water and the prolonged neutral immersion bath (92 o to 96 o F) at bed time, when one’s nerves are usually irritable, are also effective measures.

      Along with the various measures for the treatment of insomnia, all efforts should be made to eliminate as many stress factors as possible. The steps in this direction should include regular practice of any relaxation method or meditation technique, cultivating the art of doing things slowly (particularly activities like eating, walking and talking) limiting the working day to 9-10 hours and five and a half days weekly, cultivating a creative hobby and spending some time daily on this, avoiding working against unrealistic targets and completing one task before starting another.

      Good Luck, Have a Good Sleep.

  25. QUESTION:
    hello i was just prescribed ultram which i have never heard of is it like percocet or less effective?

    • ANSWER:
      Far less effective. It's Tramadol. I was on it for awhile and it didn't help my pain much at all. And people that say it isn't addictive are wrong. They need to check out their facts.

      Brand name:
      Ultram
      Generic name: Tramadol hydrochloride

      Why is Ultram prescribed?

      Ultram is prescribed to relieve moderate to moderately severe pain.

      Most important fact about Ultram

      You should not drive a car, operate machinery, or perform any other potentially hazardous activities until you know how this drug affects you.

      How should you take Ultram?

      It's important to take Ultram exactly as prescribed. Do not increase the dosage or length of time you take this drug without your doctor's approval.

      If you miss a dose...
      Take it as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the one you missed and go back to your regular schedule. Never take 2 doses at once.
      Storage instructions...
      Store in a tightly closed container at room temperature.

      What side effects may occur?

      Side effects cannot be anticipated. If any develop or change in intensity, tell your doctor as soon as possible. Only your doctor can determine if it is safe for you to continue taking Ultram.

      Side effects may include:
      Agitation, anxiety, bloating and gas, constipation, convulsive movements, diarrhea, dizziness, drowsiness, dry mouth, feeling of elation, hallucinations, headache, indigestion, itching, nausea, nervousness, sweating, tremor, vomiting, weakness

      Why should Ultram not be prescribed?

      Avoid Ultram if it has ever given you an allergic reaction. Also avoid Ultram after taking large doses of sleeping pills such as Halcion, Dalmane, and Restoril; narcotic pain relievers such as Demerol, morphine, Darvon, and Percocet; or psychotherapeutic drugs such as antidepressants and tranquilizers. And do not take Ultram after drinking excessive amounts of alcohol.

      Special warnings about Ultram

      If you have stomach problems such as an ulcer, make sure your doctor is aware of them. Ultram may hide the symptoms, making them difficult to diagnose and treat.

      Ultram can cause mental and physical addiction. If you've ever had a problem with narcotic painkillers such as Percocet, Demerol, or morphine, you should avoid this drug. Withdrawal symptoms may occur if you stop taking Ultram abruptly. Such symptoms include anxiety, sweating, insomnia, pain, nausea, tremor, diarrhea, and respiratory problems. A gradual decrease in dosage will help prevent these symptoms.

      Do not take more than the recommended dose of Ultram, since larger doses have been known to cause seizures, especially if you have epilepsy or are taking medications that also increase the risk of seizures. Among such medications are almost all antidepressant drugs, plus narcotics and major tranquilizers such as Loxitane and Stelazine.

      If you have liver or kidney disease, be sure your doctor knows about it. Your dosage may have to be reduced.

      Before you have any kind of surgery, make sure the doctor knows you are taking Ultram.

      If you have any kind of breathing problem, use Ultram with caution or take a different kind of painkiller. Ultram can impair respiration, especially if taken with alcohol.

      If you have experienced a head injury, consult your doctor before taking Ultram. The medication's effects may be stronger and could hide warning signs of serious trouble.

      Recommended dosage for Ultram

      ADULTS

      The usual starting dose for chronic pain is 25 milligrams once a day in the morning. The daily dosage is then increased every 3 days until it reaches 200 milligrams taken in four doses of 50 milligrams each. After the phase-in period, Ultram may be taken in doses of 50 to 100 milligrams every 4 to 6 hours, depending on the severity of pain. If rapid pain relief is needed, the phase-in steps can be skipped, though side effects will be more likely. The maximum dosage under any circumstances is 400 milligrams a day (300 milligrams for those over age 75).

      For people with kidney problems, the usual starting dose is 50 to 100 milligrams every 12 hours; and the maximum per day is 200 milligrams. For those with cirrhosis, the usual dose is 50 milligrams every 12 hours.

      Overdosage

      An overdose of Ultram can be fatal. If you suspect an overdose, seek emergency medical treatment immediately.

      Symptoms of Ultram overdose include:
      Difficult or slowed breathing, drowsiness, coma, seizures, cardiac arrest

  26. QUESTION:
    What are the signs of depression............?
    in a teen and depression in general. And when you go to the doctor how do you tell them that you think you might be depressed and then what do they do to find out. Thx.

    • ANSWER:
      Loss of interest in normal daily activities. You lose interest in or pleasure from activities that you used to enjoy.
      Depressed mood. You feel sad, helpless or hopeless, and may have crying spells.
      In addition, for a doctor or other health professional to diagnose depression, most of the following signs and symptoms also must be present for at least two weeks.

      Sleep disturbances. Sleeping too much or having problems sleeping can be a sign you're depressed. Waking in the middle of the night or early in the morning and not being able to get back to sleep are typical.
      Impaired thinking or concentration. You may have trouble concentrating or making decisions and have problems with memory.
      Changes in weight. An increased or reduced appetite and unexplained weight gain or loss may indicate depression.
      Agitation. You may seem restless, agitated, irritable and easily annoyed.
      Fatigue or slowing of body movements. You feel weariness and lack of energy nearly every day. You may feel as tired in the morning as you did when you went to bed the night before. You may feel like you're doing everything in slow motion, or you may speak in a slow, monotonous tone.
      Low self-esteem. You feel worthless and have excessive guilt.
      Less interest in sex. If you were sexually active before developing depression, you may notice a dramatic decrease in your level of interest in having sexual relations.
      Thoughts of death. You have a persistent negative view of yourself, your situation and the future. You may have thoughts of death, dying or suicide.
      Depression can also cause a wide variety of physical complaints, such as gastrointestinal problems (indigestion, constipation or diarrhea), headache and backache. Many people with depression also have symptoms of anxiety.

      Children, teens and older adults may react differently to depression. In these groups, symptoms may take different forms or may be masked by other conditions. Kids may pretend to be sick, worry that a parent is going to die, perform poorly in school, refuse to go to school, or exhibit behavioral problems. Older people may be more willing to discuss the physical manifestations of depression, instead of their emotional difficulties.

      Types of depression
      The main types of depression include:

      Major depression. This type of mood disturbance lasts more than two weeks. Symptoms may include overwhelming feelings of sadness and grief, loss of interest or pleasure in activities you usually enjoy, and feelings of worthlessness or guilt. This type of depression may result in poor sleep, a change in appetite, severe fatigue and difficulty concentrating. Severe depression may increase the risk of suicide.
      Dysthymia. Dysthymia (dis-THI-me-uh) is a less severe but more chronic form of depression. Signs and symptoms usually aren't disabling, and periods of dysthymia can alternate with short periods of feeling normal. Having dysthymia places you at an increased risk of major depression.
      Adjustment disorders. If a loved one dies, you lose your job or you receive a diagnosis of cancer, it's perfectly normal to feel tense, sad, overwhelmed or angry. Eventually, most people come to terms with the lasting consequences of life stresses, but some don't. This is what's known as an adjustment disorder — when your response to a stressful event or situation causes signs and symptoms of depression. Some people develop an adjustment disorder in response to a single event. In others, it stems from a combination of stressors. Adjustment disorders can be acute (lasting less than six months) or chronic (lasting longer). Doctors classify adjustment disorders based on the primary signs and symptoms of depression or anxiety.
      Bipolar disorder. Having recurrent episodes of depression and elation (mania) is characteristic of bipolar disorder. Because this condition involves emotions at both extremes (poles), it's called bipolar disorder or manic-depressive disorder. Mania affects your judgment, causing you to make unwise decisions. Some people have bursts of increased creativity and productivity during the manic phase. The number of episodes at either extreme may not be equal. Some people may have several episodes of depression before having another manic phase, or vice versa.
      Seasonal affective disorder. Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a pattern of depression related to changes in seasons and a lack of exposure to sunlight. It may cause headaches, irritability and a low energy level.

  27. QUESTION:
    Anyone had positive pregnancy tests, miscarriage & then had doctor say never pregnant?
    Please help! I am desperate to know I'm not crazy! I know this is a lot to read by please if you have experienced this I would love a response.

    I took a FRER on 2/14 when AF was 4 days late and got a faint positive. The next morning and I took another one and got the same result. I was spotting with light cramping the day before the positive so I thought that AF was coming but it still hadn't come by 2/14 so I tested that night after our Valentine's date. On 2/15 around 3:00 pm I started bleeding bright red and developing severe cramps. The cramps lasted until around noon on 2/16 and I am still bleeding. I have seen clots and tissue in it. During this time I took 2 Clear Blue tests as well and they came up with faint positive. I have RH- blood and found out that I should get the Rhogam shot so I went to the ER tonight (2/16). They tested HCG levels and said I wasn't pregnant and sent me home with a diagnosis of dysmenorrhea or a "messed up period" as they explained it to me. So they are basically trying to say that I was never pregnant. I had the 4 positive tests, I had symptoms (nausea, tired, tender nipples, foods I love tasting weird, insomnia, hungry, tired, heartburn, indigestion, heightened sense of smell, late period-usually 26 day cycle after stopping BC in Aug but 1 cycle was 28. Got the positive on 30CD) I know my periods and I know that I don't cramp and bleed this badly. I just feel so strongly that I had a miscarriage. We have been TTC #1 since Sept and we were so happy that we went ahead and shared with family and I had to tell them it was probably a miscarriage. I don't want to now have to tell them that the doc says I was never pregnant. The worst part about it is that my hubby says we should just believe the doctors because they are "medical professionals". I am so saddened by this loss and that husband and I are not on the same page regarding what happened.

    Has anyone else been through this?

    Also since they said I wasn't pregnant they wouldn't give me the Rhogam shot. I am scared about miscarrying again because of this. Has anyone that is RH- had a healthy pregnancy after miscarrying and not receiving the shot?
    Thank you, Lexi. I appreciate it.

    • ANSWER:
      I would say that it's possible. When you went to the hospital you miscarried already so maybe that's why hcg level wasn't detected. And doctors make a mistakes sometimes. I would go to your OBGYN and talk to him about it and ask him what should you do if you get pregnant next time. Good luck

  28. QUESTION:
    What do these symptoms suggest?
    Someone wanted me to ask about these symptoms. I believe I know what it is but I want some confirmation so I'm not going to say what I think it is. I'm writing my question this way because I want to see if other people believe it is what I think it is. I'm not looking for "they need to go see a docter soon" type answers just what you believe these symptoms suggest.

    1. After swallowing food the food does not stay in the stomach but moves back into the esophagus. This symptom has been present for 2-3 years.

    2. There is movement of the left testicle when taking a deep breathe or coughing. This symptom has been present for as long as the person can remember. They were unaware that this was unusual.
    Most of these answers have been good and helpful, but some say movement of the testicles is normal and others say its not. I was always under the impression that the "turn your head and cough" test was to check for movement. The answers that say no movement of the testicle is a sign of a problem concern me because the person has no movement in the right testicle. Asking these questions is leaving me with more questions than before I asked.
    Someone asked if the food is for sure coming back up; yes. Without being to graphic; the person can easily vomit on demand because the food is already there and there nothing seeming to hold it in the stomach.
    An answer to a question I over looked; yes there is pain at times in the testicle that moves.

    • ANSWER:
      It is normal for the testicles to move when you cough. The testicles in the fetus are formed up high under the diaphragm in a space called the retroperitoneum. Just before birth, they begin to descend toward the scrotum. In order to reach this site, they must actually punch a whole in the abdominal muscles. The spermatic cord supports the testicle(s) and contains the blood vessels and nerves necessary for their function. Remnants of the abdominal muscles actually wrap around the cord as a permanent envelopment called the cremaster muscles. Any activity (such as coughing, lifting, etc.) which contracts the abdominal muscles simultaneously contracts the cremaster muscles. Contracting the cremaster muscle, pulls on the testicle causing them to move. It is also true that a hernia will often become more prominent as a mass in the upper scrotum with coughing. This may or may not move the testicle. As long as you are pain free, there is no urgency. If you develop severe pain, see as doctor ASAP. In that case, one has to be sure you do not have an incarcerated hernia (one that does not allow the intestines to go back into the abdomen when you relax) or a twisted testicle (torsion). With your present description, however, it is most likely a normal cremasteric reflex you are noting.

      On the other hand
      The Symptoms of a Paraesophageal Hiatal Hernia
      Paraesophageal hernias often do not display any symptoms, but when symptoms are present, they are as follows:
      Sudden severe chest pain
      Radiating chest pain that isn't relieved by taking an antacid
      Difficulty swallowing
      Stomach pain
      Indigestion
      Nausea
      Vomiting
      Retching

      So I suspect it is what they call GERD

      What is GERD?
      Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a more serious form of gastroesophageal reflux (GER), which is common. GER occurs when the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) opens spontaneously, for varying periods of time, or does not close properly and stomach contents rise up into the esophagus. GER is also called acid reflux or acid regurgitation, because digestive juices—called acids—rise up with the food. The esophagus is the tube that carries food from the mouth to the stomach. The LES is a ring of muscle at the bottom of the esophagus that acts like a valve between the esophagus and stomach.

      When acid reflux occurs, food or fluid can be tasted in the back of the mouth. When refluxed stomach acid touches the lining of the esophagus it may cause a burning sensation in the chest or throat called heartburn or acid indigestion. Occasional GER is common and does not necessarily mean one has GERD. Persistent reflux that occurs more than twice a week is considered GERD, and it can eventually lead to more serious health problems. People of all ages can have GERD.

      What are the symptoms of GERD?
      The main symptom of GERD in adults is frequent heartburn, also called acid indigestion—burning-type pain in the lower part of the mid-chest, behind the breast bone, and in the mid-abdomen. Most children under 12 years with GERD, and some adults, have GERD without heartburn. Instead, they may experience a dry cough, asthma symptoms, or trouble swallowing.

      What causes GERD?
      The reason some people develop GERD is still unclear. However, research shows that in people with GERD, the LES relaxes while the rest of the esophagus is working. Anatomical abnormalities such as a hiatal hernia may also contribute to GERD. A hiatal hernia occurs when the upper part of the stomach and the LES move above the diaphragm, the muscle wall that separates the stomach from the chest. Normally, the diaphragm helps the LES keep acid from rising up into the esophagus. When a hiatal hernia is present, acid reflux can occur more easily. A hiatal hernia can occur in people of any age and is most often a normal finding in otherwise healthy people over age 50. Most of the time, a hiatal hernia produces no symptoms.

      for more information google "GERD"

  29. QUESTION:
    is 1500 mg of depakote alot for someone who has schizophrenia?
    my sis has schizophrenia
    and she takes 4 mg of risperdal. depakote is also bipolar

    • ANSWER:
      List of Depakote side effects. Depakote is one of the brand names for the generic medications valproic acid and divalproex sodium. Depakene is another brand name. These anticonvulsants are frequently used as mood stabilizers in the management of bipolar disorder. Patients taking any form of Depakote should be aware of the potential side effects.
      Common Depakote Side Effects:
      Check with your doctor if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome:
      Abdominal or stomach cramps (mild); change in menstrual periods; diarrhea; hair loss; indigestion; loss of appetite; nausea and vomiting; trembling of hands and arms; unusual weight loss or gain
      Less Common Depakote Side Effects:
      Check with your doctor if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome:
      Clumsiness or unsteadiness; constipation; dizziness; drowsiness; headache; skin rash; unusual excitement, restlessness, or irritability

      Always notify your doctor if you experience any of these Depakote side effects:
      Less Common: Abdominal or stomach cramps (severe); behavioral, mood, or mental changes; continuous, uncontrolled back-and-forth and/or rolling eye movements; double vision; increase in seizures; loss of appetite; nausea or vomiting (continuing); spots before eyes; swelling of face; tiredness and weakness; unusual bleeding or bruising; yellow eyes or skin.
      ALWAYS TAKE CARE............

  30. QUESTION:
    Provera, does it have side effects?
    My doctor just prescribed me Provera to regulate my periods. Does this pill have any side effects? If so, what kind? Also, do you think it will help with weight loss. I feel I am so bloated for not having a period for almost 5 months now. Thank you in advance.
    I am referring to Provera, not Depo-Provera....

    • ANSWER:
      All tablets have side effects. These can effect some people more than others. It its hard to predict the level and type of side effect for each individual. Listed below are an overview of the more common side effects you may encounter, however, you may experience none, all, or only a few of these. You may also have a rare side effect not listed here - If you become aware of any other side effects, please report them to your clinic.

      If side effects are severe, you may have to stop tasking the drug and a different hormonal drug may be prescribed. Side effects are more common in pre-menopausal women who may develop menopausal side effects as a result of a reduced level of oestrogen. The commonest side effects, apart from nausea, are hot flushes and sweats, particularly at night.

      Flushes and sweats These are not usually prominent. Sometimes the flushes will gradually lessen over the first few months but some women continue to have them for as long as they take megace. There are a number of ways to help reduce or control hot flushes and sweats. Some women find it helpful to avoid or cut down on tea, coffee, nicotine and alcohol. Evening primrose oil has been reported to be helpful in reducing sweats but it does not work for all women and it is expensive. There are a lot of calories in Evening Primrose Oil so it may be fattening in some women. Some women have found complementary therapies have helped, and your GP may be able to give you details about obtaining these on the NHS. If you find your own therapist makes sure he or she is properly qualified and registered. If you are having very troublesome hot flushes do not hesitate to discuss some of these treatments with your doctor.

      Nausea and indigestion Feelings of sickness (nausea) and indigestion are fairly common but can often be relieved by taking your tablet(s) with foods or milk or at night. Although mild nausea is quite common initially it usually wears off after a few weeks. see diet and indigestion

      Weight gain Weight gain can be a side effect of provera and this is sometimes due to water retention but at other times a consequence of a eating more either due to a increased appetite or mild nausea - "to settle the stomach" . See coping with weight gain.

      Ankle swelling - If women are prone to ankle swelling this may be worse, it is caused by fluid retention. If one leg gets swollen tender and hot this may be a thrombosis and should be reported to your doctor immediately.

      Change in periods Women who have not yet reached the menopause may notice their monthly periods change – they may become irregular, lighter or sometimes stop altogether. Some women also notice an increase in vaginal discharge and vulval itching.
      Less common side effects include depression, tiredness and dizziness. Very rare side effect of provera includes:

      Allergic reactions – this may include skin rashes
      Temporary thinning of the hair
      Headaches – some people affected by migraine have noticed a change in the pattern of their headaches
      Flaking finger nails – after several years of treatment
      Thrombosis (blood clots) – pain, warmth, swelling or tenderness in an arm or leg or any chest pain must be reported to your doctor immediately
      Before you take provera - tell your doctor:- .

      If you have had an allergic reaction to provera in the past.
      What other medications you are taking
      If you plan to become pregnant
      If you have a history of blood clots (thrombophlebitis).

      http://www.cancernet.co.uk/provera.htm

  31. QUESTION:
    Can anyone suggest medicine for insomnia.Is it treatable or one lives with it.?
    The ordinary medicine is tranqlizers like valium and other benzo diazepam products.However, one is required to increase the dose to make them effective and the possiblity of going into depression is also not removed.hall be grateful if the proper medicine is suggested.

    • ANSWER:
      Try the Natural Cures.

      Insomnia or sleeplessness has assumed alarming proportions in present times, especially among the upper classes in urban areas. This is evident from the wide range of medication for this condition prescribed by physicians and sold by chemists. Instances of persons taking an overdose of sleeping pills with fatal results are quite frequent. Insomnia deprives a person of mental rest and thereby interferes with his activities in the daytime. It constitutes a severe health hazard when it becomes a habit.

      Sleep is a periodic state of rest for the body which is absolutely essential for its efficient functioning. Sleep gives relief from tension, rests the brain and body and a person wakes up in the morning fresh and relaxed after sleep. The amount of sleep, however, varies within very wide limits from individual to individual. Normally, 7-8 hours of sleep every night is adequate for most people. Some, however, do well with four to five hours because their sleep is deeper and more refreshing.

      Insomnia is common among the elderly for a variety of reasons. The sleep of the elderly is often punctuated by brief periods of wakefulness during the night. In such cases it is the quality rather than the quantity which is most affected. With age, there is gradual reduction of periods of deep sleep. The older person, therefore, gets roused easier. Sleep requirements also diminish with ageing. From 9 hours of sleep per night at the age of 12 the average sleep needs decrease to 8 hours at the age of 20, seven hours at 40, 6-1/2 hours at 60, and 6 hours at 80.

      Symptoms: The signs of pathological insomnia are dramatic changes in the duration and quality of sleep, persistent changes in sleep patterns, lapses of memory, and lack of concentration during the day. Other symptoms are emotional instability, loss of coordination, confusion, and a lingering feeling of indifference.

      Causes: The most common cause of sleeplessness is mental tension brought about by anxiety, worries, overwork, and overexcitement. Suppressed feelings of resentment, anger and bitterness may also cause insomnia. Constipation, dyspepsia, over-eating at night, excessive intake of tea or coffee, and going to bed hungry are among the other causes. Smoking is another unsuspected cause of insomnia as it irritates the nervous system, especially the nerves of the digestive system. Often, worrying about falling asleep is enough to keep one awake.

      The Cure: Sleeping pills are no remedy for sleeplessness. They are habit forming and become less effective when taken continuously. They lower the I.Q., dull the brain and can prove fatal if taken in excess or before or after alcohol. The side-effects of sleeping pills include indigestion, skin rashes, lowered resistance to infection, circulatory and respiratory problems, poor appetite, high blood pressure, kidney and liver problems and mental confusion.

      To overcome the problem, one should adhere to a regular sleeping schedule, going to bed at a fixed time each night and getting up at a fixed time each morning. Early to bed and early to rise is a good rule. Two hours of sleep before midnight are more beneficial than four after. It is sheer folly for students, at examination times, to keep awake till long after midnight, drinking one cup of tea after another, as that is only apt to cause blackness and inability to concentrate in the examination hall.

      Research has shown that people with chronic insomnia almost invariably marked deficiencies of such key nutrients as B-complex vitamins, and vitamin C and D as also calcium, magnesium, manganese, potassium, and zinc. The sleep mechanism is unable to function efficiently unless each of these nutrients is present in adequate amounts in the diet.

      A balanced diet with simple modifications in the eating pattern will go a long way in the treatment and cure of insomnia. Such a diet should exclude white flour products, sugar and its products, tea, coffee, chocolate, cola drinks, alcohol, fatty foods, fried foods, foods containing additives, that is chemicals for preserving, colouring and flavouring, excessive use of salt, and strong condiments.

      In the modified eating pattern, breakfast should consist of fresh and dried fruits, whole cereals, seeds and yogurt. Of the two main meals, one should consist of a large mixed salad and the other should be protein-based. A cup of milk sweetened with honey at bedtime is helpful as the amino-acid tryptophan contained in milk induces sleep.

      Sleep is often elusive. Any attempt to force it only drives it further away. It is better to divert the mind with soft music or light reading. While going to bed, visualise a blank black wall occupying the entire field of vision. Turn your thoughts to light and cheerful matters. Use light bed clothes and relax. Do not lie on your back, put on your side with one or both knees brought well up and the head and shoulders slightly forward. During the night, the position of the arms and legs should be changed frequently and a healthy sleeper usually shifts from one side to the other several times in the course of the night.

      Controlled breathing is also a great help in inducing sleep. The method is to lie on your side in bed, and then take three deep breaths expanding the abdomen completely. Then hold your breath as long as you can. Next, take three more breaths and repeat the breath holding. While you hold your breath, carbon dioxide accumulates in the body and induces natural sleep. Regular, active exercising during the day and mild exercise at bedtime enhances the quantity and the quality of sleep. Exercise stimulates the elimination of lactic acid from the body which correlates with stress and muscular tension. Regular exercise also produces hormonal changes which are beneficial to the body and to the sleep pattern. Walking, jogging, skipping, swimming are all ideal exercises. Vigorous exercise should, however, be avoided at night as this can be over-stimulating.

      Yogasanas: Yoga helps a majority of cases of insomnia in two ways. Firstly, yoga treatment helps tone up the glandular, respiratory, and nervous system. Secondly, yoga also gives physical and mental relaxation as a safety value for one’s disturbing problems. The traditional yogasanas which are effective for insomnia patients are shirsana, sarvangasana, paschimottanasana, uttanasan, viparitakarni and shavasana.

      Hydrotherapy is also effective in treatment of insomnia. Application of hot packs to the spine before retiring, hot fomentation to the spine, hot footbath, or an alternate hot and cold footbath at bedtime are all time tested methods. The cold hip bath with the feet in hot water and the prolonged neutral immersion bath (92 o to 96 o F) at bed time, when one’s nerves are usually irritable, are also effective measures.

      Along with the various measures for the treatment of insomnia, all efforts should be made to eliminate as many stress factors as possible. The steps in this direction should include regular practice of any relaxation method or meditation technique, cultivating the art of doing things slowly (particularly activities like eating, walking and talking) limiting the working day to 9-10 hours and five and a half days weekly, cultivating a creative hobby and spending some time daily on this, avoiding working against unrealistic targets and completing one task before starting another.

      Hope this helps, Good Luck.

  32. QUESTION:
    Acid Reflux and Lump in throat while pregnant? Hernia?
    I found out I am pregnant on Jan. 26. Due to irregular periods, I do not know how far along I am until my ultrasound next week. I have been going to the only prenatal program here in town, but have received pretty much no care as of yet. So, I have switched and will be driving an hour and a half to a women's clinic where I have an appointment with a midwife.

    I have been having throat problems for a month now. I finally figured out what it is and want to kick myself for not figuring it out sooner. I have some severe acid reflux. My throat and espophogus hurt everyday. Sometimes it feels like I have drank Drano. After figuring out what it is, I have stopped eating all foods that are triggers--but it is still so raw and painful. I have to sleep sitting up now. I have been chewing tums, but haven't wanted to take anything else til I talk with the midwife.

    I am also suffering from morning sickness. I have been doing a lot of dry heaving and throwing up. For the past two and a half weeks, on top of the throat pain, I constantly feel like something is in my throat. I feel it on the left side every time I swallow and sometimes even when I am not swallowing, I can still feel it there. It is worse when I am trying to sleep and sleeping. I feel like I am choking. Sometimes I just want to stick my finger down my throat and try to clear it. I wake up choking sometimes. It is so frustrating to never have any relief. When I hold a flashlight down my throat and cough the right way, I can actually see something pink and fleshy behind my left tonsil which I am sure it what I feel when I swallow. Sometimes it feels like it is creeping into the middle of my throat, and I swallow just the right way and it moves back. I just always feel it. I feel like I am going crazy. I know that feeling a lump in the throat is a symptom of acid reflux. But, I actually do have something back there and not just a feeling.

    Does anyone have an experience with this or any idea what it could me. Is it possible I have given myself a hernia in my throat from all the straining? Is this something that a midwife will be able to help with or should I go see someone else about it? If it is a hernia, what kind of relief is there? Can you get surgery while pregnant. I don't know if I can make it much longer with this problem. It is just so constant, and I feel so desperate for it to go away.

    I will also take advice on how to deal with the acid reflux while pregnant as well.

    • ANSWER:
      I've never dealt with pregnancy and I'm not sure this will help you but I had bad acid reflux a while ago so i really feel for you. Tums and Tagamet helped me but the only thing that made it go away was probiotics. I dunno--i couldnt see anything stuck in my throat; it was more like my food kept trying to crawl back up my esophagus and I kept trying to cough and I felt weird pressure on my chest (also got nausea after eating). Anyways probiotics apparently help with GI issues. There are probiotic supplements but obviously you'd need to talk to a doctor before you consider those, but there are natural sources of probiotics you can eat such as yogurt, kefir, sour krout, Kim chee (maybe skip this one cause it smells like raw sewage), and that Yakult stuff or Activia--which is manufactured, but has live active cultures. In fact, last time I was at the grocery store I noticed they now have a bunch of Kefir smoothies and kefir is supposed to be a good probiotic... If you decide to try it, try adding them to your diet slowly. I took a supplement that had a lot and my indigestion almost seemed to get worse at times before it got better over the first two weeks until it pretty much disappeared. I was getting it every day up until then and it was driving me crazy. When i stopped taking probiotics for a week it came back so for me at least, they seem to work for acid reflux.

  33. QUESTION:
    Lower right abdominal pain?
    I've been having pain in my lower right abdomen for a couple days now and I have no clue what's going on. It feels like I exercised that area too much, but I haven't exercised in forever. Also, I just started my period today after 2 months, but I have never been sexually active. It hurts when I move too.

    • ANSWER:
      Hey hun,

      First things first:

      1) Do you have a fever of 99 or more?
      2) Is the pain getting worse or staying constant?
      3) Did the pain start after lifting something?
      4) Is this pain severe?

      If you answer yes to either 1 or 4, please contact your doctor immediately and ask their advice as severe pain needs to be addressed immediately especially in that region as acute appendicitis generally causes pain there and a temperature is usually a good gauge at telling you something is wrong (not always serious but a good indicator that you need to see a doctor)

      Feel better soon!!! :)

      **********************************
      Functional Ovarian Cysts - Symptoms

      Functional ovarian cysts usually are harmless, do not cause symptoms, and go away without treatment. Ovarian cysts are often discovered during a routine pelvic exam.

      The larger the ovarian cyst is, the more likely it is to cause symptoms. When symptoms occur, they may include:

      * Frequent urination, if a large cyst is pressing against your bladder.
      * Abdominal pain.
      * Menstrual period changes.
      * Weight gain.

      More severe symptoms may develop if the cyst has twisted (torsion), is bleeding, or has ruptured. See your doctor immediately if you have any of the following pain, shock, or bleeding symptoms:

      * Sudden, severe abdominal or pelvic pain
      * Nausea and vomiting
      * Sudden faintness, dizziness, and weakness
      * Vaginal bleeding or symptoms of shock from heavy bleeding (hemorrhage)

      There are many other conditions that cause signs or symptoms of a functional ovarian cyst. This is why it's important to have any unusual pelvic symptoms checked and to have regular annual pelvic exams.

      *******************************
      Appendicitis

      Symptoms

      The main symptom of appendicitis is belly (abdominal) pain. The pain can feel like indigestion or like you need to have a bowel movement or pass gas. Many people feel the first pain near the belly button. Then it moves to the lower right side of the belly. But the pain can be in different parts of your belly or even on your side. The pain may get worse if you move, walk, or cough. You may also have a fever or feel sick to your stomach.

      Many people who have had appendicitis say the pain is hard to describe. It may not feel like any pain you have had before. It may not even be a very bad pain, but you may feel like something is wrong. If you have moderate belly pain that does not go away after 4 hours, call your doctor. If you have severe belly pain, call your doctor right away.

      You may have appendicitis if:

      * You have pain in your belly. The pain may begin around your belly button.
      * The pain in your belly gets stronger and moves below your belly button on your right side (the lower right quadrant). This is the most common place to feel pain when you have appendicitis.
      * The pain does not go away and gets worse when you move, walk, or cough.
      * You have pain in any part of your belly or on your side.
      * You feel nauseated or throw up a few times. You also may not feel like eating.
      * You have constipation, back pain, a slight fever, or a swollen abdomen.

  34. QUESTION:
    could I be 6 months pregnant and not know?
    I know this sounds crazy, but I think that I am 6 months pregnant. I have had all the tests done, and some were inconclusive and others were negative. I have gained about 15lbs, all in my stomach and hips, I have weird movement happening in my stomach, like fluttering and occasionally like someone is poking me from the inside. I have had my period all through, but it has been irregular. I have breast tenderness, strange hair growth (so gross), severe indigestion and heartburn, headaches, and have been tired a lot and overly emotional. I have had the flu off and on. I have been to the doctor twice, once to get tested, which was negative, and again because of all of the above symptoms. She just told me it was stress. I feel like there is a possibility that I am pregnant, but I've never had children before so I don't have any experience with it. Any thoughts?

    • ANSWER:
      Research the characteristics of PCOS... even though your cycle is regular the weight gain and hair growth can be signs. You need FSH, LH & Progesterone blood tests to be sure.
      Very best of luck.

  35. QUESTION:
    i think im depressed, what are the symptoms?
    well i think i might but not sure, I would just like to know the symptoms. any help would be appreciated
    wow. thank you for the help.
    I think i am depressed and now can get help but it's kinda embarrassing. i do have actually many of the symptoms. thank you for your help once again

    • ANSWER:
      Two hallmarks of depression — symptoms key to establishing a diagnosis — are:

      * Loss of interest in normal daily activities. You lose interest in or pleasure from activities that you used to enjoy.

      * Depressed mood. You feel sad, helpless or hopeless, and may have crying spells.

      In addition, for a doctor or other health professional to diagnose depression, most of the following signs and symptoms also must be present for at least two weeks.

      * Sleep disturbances. Sleeping too much or having problems sleeping can be a sign you're depressed. Waking in the middle of the night or early in the morning and not being able to get back to sleep are typical.

      * Impaired thinking or concentration. You may have trouble concentrating or making decisions and have problems with memory.

      * Changes in weight. An increased or reduced appetite and unexplained weight gain or loss may indicate depression.

      * Agitation. You may seem restless, agitated, irritable and easily annoyed.

      * Fatigue or slowing of body movements. You feel weariness and lack of energy nearly every day. You may feel as tired in the morning as you did when you went to bed the night before. You may feel like you're doing everything in slow motion, or you may speak in a slow, monotonous tone.

      * Low self-esteem. You feel worthless and have excessive guilt.

      * Less interest in sex. If you were sexually active before developing depression, you may notice a dramatic decrease in your level of interest in having sexual relations.

      * Thoughts of death. You have a persistent negative view of yourself, your situation and the future. You may have thoughts of death, dying or suicide.

      Depression can also cause a wide variety of physical complaints, such as gastrointestinal problems (indigestion, constipation or diarrhea), headache and backache. Many people with depression also have symptoms of anxiety.

      Children, teens and older adults may react differently to depression. In these groups, symptoms may take different forms or may be masked by other conditions. Kids may pretend to be sick, worry that a parent is going to die, perform poorly in school, refuse to go to school, or exhibit behavioral problems. Older people may be more willing to discuss the physical manifestations of depression, instead of their emotional difficulties.

      Types of depression
      The main types of depression include:

      * Major depression. This type of mood disturbance lasts more than two weeks. Symptoms may include overwhelming feelings of sadness and grief, loss of interest or pleasure in activities you usually enjoy, and feelings of worthlessness or guilt. This type of depression may result in poor sleep, a change in appetite, severe fatigue and difficulty concentrating. Severe depression may increase the risk of suicide.

      * Dysthymia. Dysthymia (dis-THI-me-uh) is a less severe but more chronic form of depression. Signs and symptoms usually aren't disabling, and periods of dysthymia can alternate with short periods of feeling normal. Having dysthymia places you at an increased risk of major depression.

      * Adjustment disorders. If a loved one dies, you lose your job or you receive a diagnosis of cancer, it's perfectly normal to feel tense, sad, overwhelmed or angry. Eventually, most people come to terms with the lasting consequences of life stresses, but some don't.

      This is what's known as an adjustment disorder — when your response to a stressful event or situation causes signs and symptoms of depression. Some people develop an adjustment disorder in response to a single event. In others, it stems from a combination of stressors.

      Adjustment disorders can be acute (lasting less than six months) or chronic (lasting longer). Doctors classify adjustment disorders based on the primary signs and symptoms of depression or anxiety.

      * Bipolar disorder. Having recurrent episodes of depression and elation (mania) is characteristic of bipolar disorder. Because this condition involves emotions at both extremes (poles), it's called bipolar disorder or manic-depressive disorder. Mania affects your judgment, causing you to make unwise decisions. Some people have bursts of increased creativity and productivity during the manic phase. The number of episodes at either extreme may not be equal. Some people may have several episodes of depression before having another manic phase, or vice versa.

      * Seasonal affective disorder. Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a pattern of depression related to changes in seasons and a lack of exposure to sunlight. It may cause headaches, irritability and a low energy level.

  36. QUESTION:
    What is wrong with my tummy? Pain!!!?
    Since friday I have been constipated.
    Since Saturday I have had a really bad pain in my abdomen.
    The pain sometimes becomes so bad that I scream aloud and start crying - this has happened 3 times.
    Yesterday I suddenly got diarrhoea out of nothing.
    I have a slight temperature (38*C).
    Any ideas?
    I am going to see the doctor in an hour and a half but I was wondering if I could get a better understanding of whats wrong with me before hand.
    Thank you.

    • ANSWER:
      Your docs your best bet right now because abdominal pain is a hard one to guess on without knowing which part of your abdomen hurts.

      Abdominal Pain,Age 12 and Older - Topic Overview

      The cause of abdominal problems can be hard to pinpoint. Sometimes minor and serious abdominal problems start with the same symptoms. Fortunately, most abdominal problems are minor, and home treatment is all that is needed.

      Many times the exact cause of abdominal pain is hard to find. The severity of your pain, its location, and other symptoms you have may help determine what is causing the pain.

      * Generalized pain occurs in half of the abdomen or more. Generalized pain can occur with many different illnesses and will usually go away without medical treatment. Indigestion and the stomach flu are common problems that can cause generalized pain. Home treatment may help relieve some of the discomfort. Generalized mild pain or crampy pain that becomes more severe over several hours may be a symptom of a blockage of the intestines (bowel obstruction).
      * Localized pain is located in one area of the abdomen. Localized pain that comes on suddenly and gets worse is more likely to be a symptom of a serious problem. The pain of appendicitis may start as generalized pain, but it often moves (localizes) to one area of the abdomen. The pain from gallbladder disease or peptic ulcer disease often starts in one area of the abdomen and stays in that same location. Localized pain that gradually becomes more severe may be a symptom of inflammation of an abdominal organ.
      * Cramping, which can be very painful, is rarely serious if it is relieved by passing gas or a stool. Many women have cramping pain with their menstrual periods. Generalized cramping pain is usually not a cause for concern unless it gets worse, lasts for longer than 24 hours, or localizes. Cramping that starts suddenly with diarrhea or other minor health problems can be quite painful but is usually not serious.

      Occasionally, severe pain that comes on suddenly may be a symptom of a rupture of the stomach or intestines (perforation), torsion of the testicle or ovary, a kidney stone, gallbladder disease, or blood vessel problems, such as an aortic aneurysm. The pain caused by appendicitis or gallbladder disease may increase when you move or cough. Pain that increases with movement or coughing and does not appear to be caused by strained muscles is more likely to be a symptom of a serious problem. A visit to a health professional is usually needed when severe abdominal pain comes on suddenly, or new and different mild pain slowly becomes more severe over several hours or days.

      After a minor abdominal injury, pain, nausea, or vomiting may occur but often gets better in a few minutes. Pain and other symptoms that continue, increase, or develop following an injury may mean an abdominal organ has been damaged.

      Many medicines can cause abdominal pain. Some medicines also cause side effects, such as constipation, that can make abdominal pain worse.

      Specific abdominal symptoms have been linked with ovarian cancer. These symptoms include abdominal or pelvic pain, increased abdominal size or bloating, and difficulty eating or feeling full quickly. If you have had these symptoms 12 or more times each month over the past 12 months, talk with your doctor.

      Review the Emergencies and Check Your Symptoms sections to determine if and when you need to see a health professional.

      Emergencies:

      Do you have any of the following symptoms that require emergency treatment? Call 911 or other emergency services immediately.

      * Shock. Shock is more likely to occur with an injury, bleeding, infection, or a serious illness.
      * Pain in the upper abdomen that occurs with chest pain that is crushing or squeezing, feels like a heavy weight on the chest, or occurs with any other symptoms of a heart attack
      * Moderate to severe difficulty breathing
      * Severe dehydration
      * Severe abdominal pain:
      o •And fainting (syncope)
      o •If you are older than age 60

      ***************

      Diarrhea has many causes.

      * Diarrhea is often caused by stomach flu (gastroenteritis) or food poisoning. Diarrhea is your body's way of quickly clearing viruses, bacteria, or toxins from the digestive tract. Since most cases of diarrhea are viral, they will clear up in a few days with good home treatment. E. coli is a common bacteria that causes diarrhea. E. coli infection is related to improper food preparation.
      * Drinking untreated water or unpasteurized dairy products can cause viral, bacterial, or parasitic infections, such as Giardia lamblia. Giardia lamblia parasite can cause diarrhea that develops 1 to 4 weeks later. These infections can also occur when you use untreated water to brush your teeth, wash your dishes or vegetables, or make ice for drinks.
      * Many prescription and nonprescription medicines can cause diarrhea.
      o Antibiotics may cause mild diarrhea that usually clears up without treatment. A more serious type of diarrhea caused by the bacteria Clostridium difficile (sometimes called C-diff) may occur while taking an antibiotic or shortly after finishing the antibiotic.
      o Laxatives, such as Correctol, Dulcolax, Ex-Lax, or Feen-a-Mint, may cause diarrhea.
      * Using too much of products that contain sorbitol (such as chewing gum) or fructose can cause diarrhea.
      * Some people get diarrhea while traveling (traveler's diarrhea).
      * For some people, emotional stress, irritable bowel syndrome, anxiety, or food digestion problems (such as lactose intolerance) cause diarrhea.
      * Repeated episodes of diarrhea may be caused by inflammatory bowel disease.
      * Diarrhea may also be caused by malabsorption problems and certain types of cancer.
      * Diarrhea may develop after stomach, bowel, or gallbladder surgery, or after bariatric surgery for obesity.

      Many times the exact cause of diarrhea is difficult to determine. Almost everyone has an occasional bout of diarrhea. Although diarrhea is annoying, most cases are not serious and will clear up with home treatment.

  37. QUESTION:
    How long does it take for g. vaginalis to turn into PID?
    I was exposed just over a month ago, & have finished my treatment. Since it went 3 wks undetected, & I am still feeling ill, I have concern. I am supposed to go get another culture done by my doctor in a few days, but in the meantime I would like an idea of what I'm in for. My symptoms BEFORE & DURING the antibiotics were SEVERE indigestion and pretty intense pain in the kidney area (both kept me from sleeping many nights). Both have subsided, but neither are gone, and like I said, I'm done with the treatment. Also, 72 hours ago I had sex for the fist time in a 10 months and I bled more than I had expected (the equivalent of spotting; I'm still finding the slightest bit of blood on the tp when I pee). It was only my 2nd time (ever), so I thought it was normal, but now I'm having terrible cramps for the 2nd day (I realize these cramps could be b/c I've been abstinent for about 10 months or b/c I'm 21 days into my cycle, but I NEVER get cramps normally). Could this have turned into PID?

    • ANSWER:
      It is possible... yet usually you have to have the disease for a long period of time before it causes pid... (some women go years w/o it being treated and never get pid) others arent so fortunate just depends on your body... go back to the docs and get retested... and tell him your symptoms/fears good luck!

  38. QUESTION:
    Breast and stomach pain after period. Why?
    My wife have her period from 1/5 to 1/10 2011. During her period, my wife said her period was not nornal like before and having heavy stomach pain. Now that her period is ended, she complain of breast and stomach pain.
    Thank you for your help.

    • ANSWER:
      Menstrual pains can be intense and hard to deal with. A common menstrual pain many women feel is stomach pain, which can present itself through cramps or nausea. While this pain may be unavoidable once a month, there are things you can do at home to help alleviate it.
      Causes
      Most often, the cause of your menstrual stomach pain is the contractions made by your uterus during your menstrual period. Other causes can be indigestion, constipation and even bloating from water retention. During your period, some women can even be sensitive to certain foods and that can cause stomach upset and pain.
      Heat Up
      One remedy for your menstrual mid-section anguish is heat. Using a heating pad on the abdomen for 20 minutes, or more depending on your preference, can relax the abdominal muscles and release tension. Also try a hot bath, possibly with music or scented oils to increase relaxation.
      Exercise
      Exercise during menstruation has been shown to lessen the severity of menstrual pains such as stomach cramps as well. Not only will exercise help your brain release endorphins, a natural pain killer, but they will also help to stretch out your muscles and increase blood flow. Exercises such as yoga are great for menstrual stomach pain because they not only add exercise and stretching, but also relaxation which lessens muscle tension even more so.
      Hot Tea
      Herbal teas can be great for treating stomach pains as they are gentle on the stomach and can relax and calm you. Chamomile and lavender are both great for increasing relaxation and decreasing menstrual anxiety, thus helping relieve tension in the abdominal muscles.
      Diet
      During menstruation, avoiding certain foods can decrease stomach pain as well. Foods high in sodium and carbonated sodas should be avoided because they promote bloating which can contribute to your stomach pains. Also it's important to eat foods high in iron during menstruation in order to make up for iron lost during your period, as iron deficiency can cause stomach problems such as nausea. Also avoid foods that you know you are sensitive to during menstruation in order to decrease any additional stomach pain.
      Medication
      Taking over-the-counter medications such as Tylenol, during your period can also help ease stomach pains. Taking it during your period, even before pain presents itself, can help prevent and alleviate any stomach pain during menstruation. As with any medication though, talk to your doctor if you choose to treat your pain with medication. You can also try medication such as Pepto Bismol if you suffer from indigestion during your period.
      Warnings
      Sometimes severe stomach pains during menstruation can be the sign of a deeper problem, such as endometriosis. If you have severe stomach pain that inhibits your daily life during menstruation you should see your doctor to ensure it is not a more serious condition.

  39. QUESTION:
    Missed Period, Cramps, Negative Pregnancy Test?
    The cramps are'nt severe but they come and go during my day. I missed my period but the pregnancy test says negative. I have no blood spotting, but I stopped using the Birth Control Pill this month, and before I stopped I messed up on my birth control three times and had 3 forced periods for a month and a half (alternating weeks)...could i have just missed my period because my cycle is effed up?

    • ANSWER:
      It’s not uncommon to miss a period. In itself, that’s not a worrisome symptom, however if you miss a couple of periods, it's usually recommended to do a pregnancy test (which in this case you have already done). You may have to consult with your doctor because if you're not pregnant, there could be some other problem that needs to be evaluated.

      There are many possible reasons for a missed period, including stress, weight gain/loss, hormonal abnormalities, which cause fluctuating levels of the hormones needed to support menstruation, such as stopping the birth control pill, illness and certain medications.

      However, if abdominal pain is present, a closer look is needed. It may be that your abdominal pains are unrelated to the missed period, but could be caused by:

      * Excessive gas
      * Chronic constipation
      * Viral gastroenteritis (stomach flu)
      * Irritable bowel syndrome
      * Heartburn or indigestion
      * Gastroesophageal reflux
      * Ulcers
      * Cholecystitis (inflammation of the gallbladder) with or without gallstones
      * Appendicitis (inflammation of the appendix)
      * Diverticular disease, including inflammation of small pouches that form in the large intestines (diverticulitis)
      * Bowel obstruction -- in addition to pain, this causes nausea, bloating, vomiting, and inability to pass gas or stool
      * Food allergy
      * Food poisoning (salmonella, shigella)
      * Hernia
      * Kidney stones
      * Urinary tract infections
      * Pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas)
      * Dissecting abdominal aortic aneurysm -- bleeding into the wall of the aorta

      Abdominal pain that is similar to that of period cramping may indicate a problem in a reproductive organ. This includes conditions such as endometriosis (when tissue from the uterus is displaced to somewhere else like the pelvic wall or ovaries), uterine fibroids (thick bands of muscular and fibrous tissue in the uterus), ovarian cysts, ovarian cancer (rare), or pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) infection of the reproductive organs, usually from a sexually transmitted disease.

      Based on your symptoms and what you wrote, I would recommend that you consult with your doctor/gynaecologist, just to rule out any serious causes.

      Good luck :)

  40. QUESTION:
    Pregnant, or really bad pms?
    I've been feeling generally naseous and had indigestion for the last 3 days. I had sex with my boyfriend on the pill, but I'm overweight and I know that can make it harder to get pregnant.

    I recently felt severe cramping on one side of my lower tummy that comes and goes. I've never felt like this before my period which should be due in the next few days (i'm on the second day of the sugar pills or w/e).

    Could there be something more serious going on?
    My tummy has just been feeling TORE UP-ugh. And anyone have any tips on alleviating the pain?
    sorry.. its not my lower tummy, its like my idk i know its kinda to the left of my hip, im assuming my ovary is located there

    • ANSWER:
      I think you should go buy a OTC pregnancy test or go to your dr. just to rule out pregnancy. With mine I got pain in my uterus around the fallopian tube. I thought for sure I was going to have an ectopic pregnancy, but I didn't. YOu just might be having stomach problems too.

  41. QUESTION:
    Mirena coil. Help please???
    Hi there, so I have had the mirena Coil fitted for around 6 months now. For the first four months I've had a regular period lasting around 5-7 days. For the past two months I've had no period at all and I have been getting seriously painful indigestion/heartburn/constipation (something I've never had before) so what I want to know is, is it normal for my periods to not be present at all anymore even though they were regular for the first 4 months and is the indigestion a side effect of the coil? Also the pain (under my ribcage and in my back) is so severe that indigestion medicine and paracetamol have no effect.

    • ANSWER:
      With Mirena it's perfectly normal to have no period at all, when I had it I didn't have any period for 7 years.
      Indigestion etc shouldn't be a side effect of Mirena because it's usually not hormone related. Constipation and heartburn could be .. you should check with your doctor see if you can associate this with other signs and symptoms.

  42. QUESTION:
    IS ANYONE ELSE 7DPO? HOW ARE YOU FEELING? ANYONE TESTED YET?
    me

    - bloated
    - gassy
    - cramping on and off
    - peeing a bit more than usual
    - eating everything!

    could be signs of pms, but it usually doesn't happen until a say or 2 before my period.

    baby dust to everyone!
    the only thing i ever get before a period is cramping 1-2 days before... my period is not due for another 6 days.
    good luck Kim!!

    • ANSWER:
      Mostly early pregPregnancy Signs

      By Rachel Lower

      Sore and Tender Breasts, Enlarged Breasts, Bumps Around Nipples Enlarged (Montgomery's Tubercules), 'Blue Veins' (Veins More Apparent), Darkening of Areolas, Colostrum, Fullness, Tingling Nipples
      Tenderness of the breasts can start as early as a few days after conception. Other breast changes occur anytime in the first trimester.

      Basil Body Temperature Remains High
      If you chart your bbt, you will notice your temperature remains high.

      Missed Period (Amenorrhoea), Extremely Light Period, Implantation Bleeding, Spotting
      Menstruation is usually absent throughout your entire pregnancy. You may have a bit of spotting or scantly menstrual flow. Implantation bleeding can occur between 5-10 days after conception, though only in about 5% of all women.

      Abdomen Enlarged, Bloating, Cramping, Uterus Enlarged, Uterus Shape Changed, Weight Gain, Blue Lines on Abdomen, Darkening of Line From Navel to Pubis (Linea Nigra)
      Within two weeks of conception your uterus starts enlarging. Minimal, slight cramping and bloating may also occur. You can start "showing" from 8 weeks. Those who have had a previous pregnancy should find themselves "popping out" sooner then they did the first time around. The line from your navel to pubis can appear in your 4th or 5th month. Blue lines may appear on your abdomen as they may on your breasts.

      Cervix Softening (Goodell's Sign), Chadwick's Sign (Bluish Tinge to the Vagina and Cervix), Vaginal Discharge Changes
      Goodell's and Chadwick's signs both occur in the first trimester. Vaginal discharge can be varied, and often a golden discharge is an early sign of pregnancy. Beware of infections and have them treated asap.

      Frequent Urination
      Frequent urination usually begins 6-12 weeks after conception.

      Food Cravings, Hunger, Thirst, Indigestion, Heartburn, Constipation, Gas, Metallic Taste in Mouth, Nausea, Vomitting (Morning Sickness, any time of the day), Ptyalism (Excessive Salivation), Sense of Smell Increased, Some Smells Nauseating
      Morning sickness usually appears 2-7 weeks after conception. All of these symptoms could pop up in the first trimester.

      Fatigue, Sleeping Problems
      Early in pregnancy many women find themselves more tired than usual. Other symptoms can cause problems when trying to sleep at night, such as sore breasts making it hard to get into a comfortable position.

      Mood Swings
      Hormones and normal anxieties can cause mood swings through out pregnancy.

      Aches and Pains, Backaches, Frequent Headaches, Nosebleeds, Stuffy Noses, Sinus Problems
      Hormones, blood circulation, and the load on your body can cause these symptoms at various times in pregnancy. The doctor should be called if any of them are severe or persistent.

      Quickening (Fetal Movement), Braxton Hicks Contractions
      Intermittent painless contractions can occur early in pregnancy, and will increase in frequency. Fetal movement is noticeable starting at 14-20 weeks.

      Stretch Marks, Spider Veins, Acne, Skin Pigmentation Changes, "Puffy" Face, Red and Itchy Palms and Soles, Itching, Perspiration, Heat Rashes, Bluish and Blotchy Legs, Varicose Veins, Changes in Hair, Nails, etc.
      During the entire pregnancy one may wonder who's skin they are in!
      symptoms....

  43. QUESTION:
    Is this normal? Mirena coil?
    Hi there, so I have had the mirena Coil fitted for around 6 months now. For the first four months I've had a regular period lasting around 5-7 days. For the past two months I've had no period at all and I have been getting seriously painful indigestion/heartburn/constipation (something I've never had before) so what I want to know is, is it normal for my periods to not be present at all anymore even though they were regular for the first 4 months and is the indigestion a side effect of the coil? Also the pain (under my ribcage and in my back) is so severe that indigestion medicine and paracetamol have no effect.

    • ANSWER:
      No it's not. See your doctor.

  44. QUESTION:
    do you think menopause often result to nervous breakdown?

    • ANSWER:
      NO, women don't have a nervous breakdown going into menopause.
      Menopause varies from woman to woman, the symptoms can be severe or very minimal.

      Surgical menopause: a woman's symptoms can be more severe due the sudden change in the removal of her uterus & ovaries which affect her hormone production.

      Perimenopause is the phase before menopause actually takes place, when ovarian hormone production is declining and fluctuating, causing a host of symptoms.

      Hot flashes, flushes, night sweats and/or cold flashes, clammy feeling (see note)
      Irregular heart beat
      Irritability
      Mood swings, sudden tears
      Trouble sleeping through the night (with or without night sweats)
      Irregular periods; shorter, lighter periods; heavier periods, flooding; phantom periods, shorter cycles, longer cycles
      Loss of libido (see note)
      Dry vagina (see note)
      Crashing fatigue
      Anxiety, feeling ill at ease
      Feelings of dread, apprehension, doom (see note)
      Difficulty concentrating, disorientation, mental confusion
      Disturbing memory lapses
      Incontinence, especially upon sneezing, laughing; urge incontinence (see note)
      Itchy, crawly skin (see note)
      Aching, sore joints, muscles and tendons (see note)
      Increased tension in muscles
      Breast tenderness
      Headache change: increase or decrease
      Gastrointestinal distress, indigestion, flatulence, gas pain, nausea
      Sudden bouts of bloat
      Depression (see note)
      Exacerbation of existing conditions
      Increase in allergies
      Weight gain (see note)
      Hair loss or thinning, head, pubic, or whole body; increase in facial hair
      Dizziness, light-headedness, episodes of loss of balance
      Changes in body odor
      Electric shock sensation under the skin and in the head (see note)
      Tingling in the extremities (see note)
      Gum problems, increased bleeding
      Burning tongue, burning roof of mouth, bad taste in mouth, change in breath odor
      Osteoporosis (after several years)
      Changes in fingernails: softer, crack or break easier
      Tinnitus: ringing in ears, bells, 'whooshing,' buzzing etc. (see note)

  45. QUESTION:
    what are symptoms of ovarian cancer? is it painful? does your back ache?

    • ANSWER:
      I lost a good friend two years ago to this horrible disease. In the beginning it is a silent cancer. Due to it's location in the body it has lots of room to grow before it causes any pain.

      From your American Cancer Society.
      See a doctor if you have symptoms

      Early cancers of the ovaries tend to cause symptoms that are more commonly caused by other things. These symptoms include abdominal swelling or bloating (due to a mass or accumulation of fluid), pelvic pressure or abdominal pain, difficulty eating or feeling full quickly, and/or urinary symptoms (having to go urgently or often). Most of these symptoms can also be caused by other less serious conditions, but when the symptoms are caused by ovarian cancer they tend to be more severe and are a change from how a woman usually feels.

      By the time ovarian cancer is considered as a possible cause of these symptoms, it may have already spread beyond the ovaries. Also, some types of ovarian cancer can rapidly spread to the surface of nearby organs. Still, prompt attention to symptoms may improve the odds of early diagnosis and successful treatment. If you have symptoms similar to those of ovarian cancer almost daily for more than a few weeks, and they can't be explained by other more common conditions, report them to your health care professional -- preferably a gynecologist -- right away.

      From your National Cancer Institute.
      Symptoms

      Early ovarian cancer may not cause obvious symptoms. But, as the cancer grows, symptoms may include:

      * Pressure or pain in the abdomen, pelvis, back, or legs
      * A swollen or bloated abdomen
      * Nausea, indigestion, gas, constipation, or diarrhea
      * Feeling very tired all the time

      Less common symptoms include:

      * Shortness of breath
      * Feeling the need to urinate often
      * Unusual vaginal bleeding (heavy periods, or bleeding after menopause)

      Most often these symptoms are not due to cancer, but only a doctor can tell for sure. Any woman with these symptoms should tell her doctor..

      Five year survival depends on the type, and stage at diagnosis. For some forums of ovarian cancer it is a mere 18%.

  46. QUESTION:
    Severe stomach cramps?
    When I get really hungry, I get slight stomach cramps. Then when I eat something, they get really severe, so much so that I'm doubled over. Even taking painkillers doesn't help. I sometimes get the same stomach cramps first thing in the morning, before I've eaten anything. They are in the upper part of my stomach, just under my ribcage. It's also not period pains or anything like that...I'm 15....what could be the reason for these pains??

    • ANSWER:
      wind or indigestion probably.
      Maybe you're eating too fast?
      the same thing happens to me.
      farting usually helps haha
      wind can be EXTREMELY painful.
      just try not to eat too fast and you should be fine.

  47. QUESTION:
    Could i have an ovary cyst?
    Im 19 and on the contraceptive pill since last november. Last month before my period i start getting pains that felt like ovulation pains which was odd especially in my left side, but after my period it just went, but again this month its the same thing but way worser! ive had sharp ovulation pain in my left side mainly then the pain spreaded to my abdominal area and has been so painful! it feels like im constipated but i'm not if you get me?! the pain in my left side feels very painful, sore and achy and feels like there some sort of pressure, im not eating as much cos my stomach is a bit bloated and im going for a wee more often, and the pain is also in my lower back and at the top of my leg. Ive always had painful ovulation pain so im not sure if i could always had ovary cysts without realising, i haven't got any other symptoms so im confused.
    Could i have them?
    My friend said ovary cysts come and go during your period :S
    Can ovary cysts do this to you?
    Thanks. :)

    • ANSWER:
      Abdominal/pelvic pain that is similar to that of period cramping may indicate a problem in a reproductive organ (like the pain around your ovaries or uterus).

      This includes conditions such as endometriosis (when tissue from the uterus is displaced to somewhere else like the pelvic wall or ovaries), uterine fibroids (thick bands of muscular and fibrous tissue in the uterus), ovarian cysts, ovarian cancer (rare), or pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) infection of the reproductive organs, usually from a sexually transmitted disease.

      If you have pain in your ovary area, you might have an ovarian cyst. I have experienced that same type of pain whenever I have had an ovarian cyst. I was also diagnosed with endometriosis last year which caused me severe pelvic pain and intense and painful period cramping.

      If a gynaecological reason cannot be found for the pain you are experiencing, then it could be a gastroenterology problem which could be caused by excessive gas, chronic constipation, viral gastroenteritis (stomach flu), IBS (Irritable bowel syndrome), heartburn or indigestion, gastroesophageal reflux, ulcers, cholecystitis (inflammation of the gallbladder) with or without gallstones, appendicitis (inflammation of the appendix), diverticular disease, including inflammation of small pouches that form in the large intestines (diverticulitis), bowel obstruction (in addition to pain, this causes nausea, bloating, vomiting, and inability to pass gas or stool), food allergies, food poisoning (salmonella, shigella), hernia, kidney stones, UTI’s (urinary tract infections), pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas) or dissecting abdominal aortic aneurysm (bleeding into the wall of the aorta).

      Based on your symptoms and what you wrote, I would recommend that you should see your doctor/gynaecologist, and if nothing is found that you see a gastroenterologist just to rule out any serious GI causes.

      Good luck :)

  48. QUESTION:
    Im having lower stomach pains at 14.?
    Im 14 years old and i have been having stomach pains for a few days now. I thought that it maybe my period but i don't get my period till the middle of the month. It really hurts when i bend, run and sit up. Normal?
    Its also been burning inside when i sit up or bend. I have been constipated sense the pain. And i have been peeing alot like i cant hold it.
    Could it be a appendicitis?

    • ANSWER:
      go to http://symptoms.webmd.com/default.htm and enter in your symptoms and it will generate the most likely causes

      Also The main symptom of appendicitis is belly (abdominal) pain. The pain can feel like indigestion or like you need to have a bowel movement or pass gas. Many people feel the first pain near the belly button. Then it moves to the lower right side of the belly. But the pain can be in different parts of your belly or even on your side. The pain may get worse if you move, walk, or cough. You may also have a fever or feel sick to your stomach.

      Many people who have had appendicitis say the pain is hard to describe. It may not feel like any pain you have had before. It may not even be a very bad pain, but you may feel like something is wrong. If you have moderate belly pain that does not go away after 4 hours, call your doctor. If you have severe belly pain, call your doctor right away.

      You may have appendicitis if:

      You have pain in your belly. The pain may begin around your belly button.
      The pain in your belly gets stronger and moves below your belly button on your right side (the lower right quadrant ). This is the most common place to feel pain when you have appendicitis.
      The pain does not go away and gets worse when you move, walk, or cough.
      You have pain in any part of your belly or on your side.
      You feel nauseated or throw up a few times. You also may not feel like eating.
      You have constipation, back pain, a slight fever, or a swollen abdomen.

  49. QUESTION:
    Is this an IBS flareup?
    ON Christmas day I was doing really good stomach wise besides alittle bloating (i was on the second day of my period) I didn't eat much because it was so busy at the house and I laid down for a nap and noticed a dull ache in my upper middle back that went all the way foward through my chest. I flipped and flopped from the annoyance of the pain until I finally fell asleep and when I woke up it was gone so I assumed it was gas. It came back later after I ate. I was constipated before my period and once my period came i used the bathroom normally a couple times. Then yesterday I noticed at night i started bloating real bad especially in my upper stomach and then down in my lower colon. At like 3AM i felt like i had a serious urgency/cramps/nausea of diarreah and when i went it was normal stool, but i went several times after that and each time i did it became looser and looser until it was nearly just water (Sorry for the TMI but if you're looking at this you know about IBS so its no big deal) This has happened to me before. I'll get constipated then after the constipations gone a few days later i'll have diarrhea until i'm emptied. Whats different about this time is usually the next day I feel alot better. This time i still have alot of gas and bloating and not much of an appetite (well i have abit of an appetite but im afraid if I eat it'll go right through me..) Does this sound like an IBS flareup? Im getting pains in my back and chest again and it usually happens at night and goes away after a couple of hours whether I release gas or not. I was diagnosed with IBS when i was fourteen, i'm nineteen now. So is this just a flareup?

    Also is it normal to get really gassy if you haven't eaten much, it seems the less I eat the more i bloat. I get indigestion and gurgling/gas in my stomach if i dont eat much that day.

    • ANSWER:
      it's very difficult to say if it is a flareup or if it's something else.

      since th traditional christmas meal is quite a gassy one, the gas could just be down to what you have eater.

      the loose and hard stools are normal symptoms of IBS, but coupled with the pain, you could have food poisoning, the only way to tell is if the pain is severe, you should really go and see your doctor about it.

      if you are finding that the pain is lasting a long time (more then a few hours) or waking you up from your sleep, you should seek some medical assistance, especially if it's coupled with vomiting,

      the symptoms that you are describing sounds like it could be a appendicitis, which is life threatening, just keep an eye on the symptoms that you have, it can take up to a week before it gets serious, but if you suspect a appendicitis (google the symptoms and see if you have any of them) then you should go to the emergency room strait away, the pain can migrate round and radiate, and is similar to IBS and cramping pains, so is quite difficult to determine if it could be that or not.

      Edit_

      if you have IBS, it's good to keep these things somewhere accessible, just in case the need should arise.

      Imodium or medication for diorrea (imodium Plus is fantastic!)
      Paracetamol, there better for IBS sufferers for pain relief, 2 500mg tablets every 4-5 hours.
      Rennie or anti acid tablets/solution,
      Wind-eze or gas tablets, these help to turn small bubbles of gas that are in your gut into a big one so it's easier to pass it out rather then have it all bubbling away inside.
      A laxative solution, to add water to your stool to make it softer, make sure that it's a type that draws water from the bowel, others can cause problems with IBS sufferers.

      some people have found Fibre supplements like Fybogel to help with the problems, it makes the stool form better, but is usually problematic for IBS sufferers.

  50. QUESTION:
    does anybody know a website with interesting facts about being pregnant....?
    or statistics like the chances of having blue eyes, or stuff like that.....

    • ANSWER:
      As the baby gets bigger, you may notice some shortness of breath. As your growing uterus presses on your diaphragm, it becomes harder to fill your lungs and to breathe out completely.

      You may have more swelling (edema) in your feet now. If so, avoid standing.

      During pregnancy, a number of conditions can cause fainting: particularly hot weather, sudden changes in posture, standing for long periods of time, fatigue or excitement, stuffy rooms, and crowds.

      A couple days into your 28th week of pregnancy, your baby's brain can direct rhythmic breathing and control body temperature and its brain can usually stimulate it to breathe and sustain that activity without medical intervention.

      The bladder is usually a convex (rounded) organ, but is rendered concave (squashed) from external pressure during pregnancy. Thus, its retention capacity is greatly reduced.

      Milk production burns 500-650 calories per day---that's more than a pound per week because of breastfeeding alone.

      By 29 weeks pregnant, your baby has all 300 of its bones.

      You may experience some pain and tenderness in the rib area right below your breasts if the baby sits high in your uterus (pain is also due to frequent kicking). You can relieve some of the rib area discomfort by lying down when you can and avoiding bending forward. Your baby will begin to shift position and settle more into your pelvis as the pregnancy continues.

      All babies should be placed on their backs to sleep.

      When you sleep, you may notice some discomfort due to indigestion or to the pressure of your baby and your uterus on your ribs and diaphragm.

      Breastfeeding may provide your baby with some protection against the development of cancer of the lymph glands (lymphoma) and childhood-onset diabetes. Furthermore, it can help protect you against breast cancer if you nurse for at least 9 months.

      Expect to have trouble finding a comfortable sleeping position and to experience leg cramps while sleeping. Use your pillows!!!

      Expect some colostrum or premilk to leak from your breasts and plan for breastfeeding.

      Relieve skin itchiness and irritation by swimming or applying lotion to the affected area.

      You may notice that you're a little clumsy these days. This is due to the increased size of your uterus, the loosening of your joints to prepare for childbirth, and the shifts in your baby's position.

      You may notice some increased shortness of breath. As your baby gets bigger and crowds more and more into your lungs, it's going to take more effort for you to breathe deeply.

      You will notice backaches. The small of your back will have an increasingly difficult time balancing the load, as you and your baby get larger. If your backache is severe and persistent, contact your OB.

      You may continue to have leg cramps, especially when you are trying to sleep.

      You may notice some colostrum leaking from your breasts---it's a yellowish fluid that pre-cedes actual milk production.

      Mild edema, or swelling, of your hands, feet, ankles, and face is still considered to be common, as excess fluid continues to collect in your tissues. Drinking plenty of fluids (especially water with lemon juice,) elevating your legs when you sit, lying on your left side, trying to maintain a comfortable body temperature, and wearing support stockings (you can buy them at Wal Mart) can all help you feel more comfortable.

      You may be bothered more by constipation now than before. As your uterus becomes larger, it pushes more on your bowel, interfering with its normal activity and making it more sluggish than usual. Strong black tea is to be avoided during pregnancy because of the constipating effect of tannin.

      By a few days into the 33rd week of pregnancy, the volume of amniotic fluid has reached its maximum. The amniotic fluid is clear, watery, and straw-colored. By the time you reach the due date, the amniotic sac contains a liter of fluid.

      You may notice more le fatigue and more varicose veins in your legs and abdomen. As your weight and blood volume increase, more and more pressure is placed on the veins of your legs and the legs themselves, resulting in a dull, aching pain. Try putting on support stockings (you can buy them at Wal Mart) as soon as you get up in the morning to ease the achiness. Also, stay off your feet as much as possible.

      Congrats & Good luck! Everything goes by so fast!


severe indigestion before period

This entry was posted in Heartburn and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed.