Gaviscon Side Effects Calcium

There are two types of cholesterol in the human organism: LDL or bad cholesterol and HDL or good cholesterol. Cholesterol can be found in different types of food, like eggs, milk and fatty meals. In the human body the cholesterol travels through the blood stream inside the lipoprotein. When a person's cholesterol level is too high there is the risk that it might cause plaque buildup in the arteries. In order to avoid that situation, individuals with cholesterol problems are advised to keep a healthy diet and perform physical exercises. If that is not enough, they might be prescribed with medication.

One of the most powerful cholesterol prescription drugs on the U.S. market is Crestor also known as rosuvastatin calcium. It should be taken once a day, and combined with a diet and exercises it can reduce the patient's cholesterol level with up to 50%. However like all medications, it also has a series of side effects. Some of the most common and minor side effects include headaches, weakness, nausea, muscle and abdominal pain. But patients might experience more severe problems.

Before beginning a treatment patients have to perform medical exams to establish any existing problems of the liver. That is necessary because the drug can cause liver damage, especially if associated with alcohol use. Other serious problems that have been reported include:

Muscle break down, consisting in severe muscle pain and general weakness, affecting especially patients older than 65 yearsKidney failureLiver enzyme abnormalitiesSevere allergic reaction, consisting in swelling of the face, difficulty breathing, itchingHeart problems, caused by the fact that the medication lowers a person's coenzyme Q10 level

If during treatment patients notice any signs of general weakness or unexplained muscle pain, they should contact a doctor as soon as possible, because they can be the symptoms of severe medical conditions. If a person has already suffered a serious injury due to the medication, he or she is advised to consult a personal injury lawyer to discuss the possibility of a product liability or medical negligence lawsuit. If there is a valid claim and a lawsuit is filed, patients are eligible for financial compensation.

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. QUESTION:
    How do you treat the condition Gord(reflux disorder)?
    I have been getting it on and of for a couple of years and have been taking NEXIUM which doesn't seem to do much. I do drink and smoke.
    I would like it cured for good any solutions?

    • ANSWER:
      First off stop smoking ! =D But this will explain it all.

      Certain foods and lifestyle are considered to promote gastroesophageal reflux, but a 2006 review suggested that evidence for most dietary interventions is anecdotal; only weight loss and elevating the head of the bed were supported by evidence.[17] A subsequent randomized crossover study showed benefit by avoiding eating two hours before bedtime.[9]

      The following may exacerbate the symptoms of GERD:

      * Coffee and alcohol stimulate gastric acid secretion. Taking these before bedtime especially can cause evening reflux.
      * Antacids based on calcium carbonate (but not aluminum hydroxide) were found to actually increase the acidity of the stomach. However, all antacids reduced acidity in the lower esophagus, so the net effect on GERD symptoms may still be positive.[18]
      * Foods high in fats and smoking reduce lower esophageal sphincter competence, so avoiding these may help. Fat also delays stomach emptying.
      * Eating within 2 3 hours before bedtime.
      * Large meals. Having smaller, more frequent meals reduces GERD risk, as it means there is less food in the stomach at any one time.
      * Carbonated soft drinks with or without sugar.
      * Chocolate and peppermint.
      * Acidic foods: tomatoes and tomato-based preparations; citrus fruits and citrus juices.
      * Cruciferous vegetables:cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, and Brussels sprouts.
      * Milk and milk-based products containing calcium[citation needed] and fat, within 2 hours of bedtime.

      Positional therapy

      Sleeping on the left side has been shown to reduce nighttime reflux episodes in patients.[19]

      A meta-analysis suggested that elevating the head of bed is an effective therapy, although this conclusion was only supported by nonrandomized studies.[17] The head of the bed can be elevated by plastic or wooden bed risers that support bed posts or legs, a therapeutic bed wedge pillow, or a wedge or an inflatable mattress lifter that fits in between mattress and box spring. The height of the elevation is critical and must be at least 6 to 8 inches (15 to 20 cm) to be at least minimally effective to prevent the backflow of gastric fluids. Some innerspring mattresses do not work well when inclined and may cause back pain; some prefer foam mattresses. Some practitioners use higher degrees of incline than provided by the commonly suggested 6 to 8 inches (15 to 20 cm) and claim greater success.

      Other lifestyle modifications

      * Avoidance of smoking.
      * Weight reduction in overweight or obese people.
      * Avoiding tight garments in those with abdominal obesity.

      [edit] Medications

      A number of drugs are approved to treat GERD, and are among the most-often-prescribed forms of medication in most Western countries.

      * Proton pump inhibitors (such as omeprazole, esomeprazole, pantoprazole, lansoprazole, and rabeprazole) are the most effective in reducing gastric acid secretion. These drugs stop acid secretion at the source of acid production, i.e., the proton pump.
      * Gastric H2 receptor blockers (such as ranitidine, famotidine and cimetidine) can reduce gastric secretion of acid. These drugs are technically antihistamines. They relieve complaints in about 50% of all GERD patients. Compared to placebo (which also is associated with symptom improvement), they have a number needed to treat of eight (8).[20]
      * Antacids before meals or symptomatically after symptoms begin can reduce gastric acidity (increase pH).
      * Alginic acid (Gaviscon) may coat the mucosa as well as increase pH and decrease reflux. A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials suggests alginic acid may be the most effective of non-prescription treatments with a number needed to treat of four.[20]
      * Prokinetics strengthen the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and speed up gastric emptying. Cisapride, a member of this class, was withdrawn from the market for causing long QT syndrome. Reglan (metoclopramide) is a prokinetic with a better side-effect profile.
      * Sucralfate (Carafate) is also useful as an adjunct in helping to heal and prevent esophageal damage caused by GERD, however it must be taken several times daily and at least two (2) hours apart from meals and medications.
      * Mosapride citrate is a 5-HT4 receptor agonist used outside the United States largely as a therapy for GERD and dyspepsia.[21]

      Clinical trials which compare GERD treatments head-to-head provide physicians with critical information. Unfortunately most pharmaceutical-company sponsored studies are conducted versus placebo and not an active control. However, the DIAMOND has shown rough equivalence of efficacy between a "step-up" approach to therapy (antacids, followed by histamine antagonists, followed by PPIs) and a "step-down" approach (the reverse). The primary endpoint of the study was treatment success after 6 months, and was achieved for 70% of patients in "step-down" versus 72% of patients in "step-up."[22]
      [edit] Surgical treatment

  2. QUESTION:
    Am taking Doxcycyline for sinus infection: but have a side effect?
    ive been taking the tablets for 3 days now 1 morning 1 evening 100mg and have started to get bloated what can i take to help with the bloating because the Doctor said dont take any gaviscon or anti acids because the medicine wont work..its starting to hurt n cant burp properly plus ive eaten n drank when taking the tablets like ive been told to.

    • ANSWER:
      Same here last time I took this. I was so greatful at the end of my 10 days or whatever.

      Sorry tho, if taking it with food doesn't help, I don't think their is much else you can do.

      You could try Simethecone (beano or gas-x) which does not interact with Doxy. Could help with the bloated feeling.

      And unfortunately sinus infections can be dangerous if it gets up in your brain. I actually knew someone who had that happen..stopped taking her antibiotics and she ended up with a bad infection in her brain and cant care for herself now.

      BTW, NCBI says: Take doxycycline 1 hour before or 2 hours after antacids (including sodium bicarbonate), calcium supplements, and laxatives containing magnesium. Take doxycycline 2 hours before or 3 hours after iron preparations and vitamin products that contain iron.....So according to them you just have to watch your timing.

  3. QUESTION:
    Any over the counter meds that will help ACID-REFLUX?
    Is there any over the counter medicines that will help my acid-reflux? Anything that will keep it from coming back? What can I do to get some instant relief from the burning pain in my chest and throat?

    TUMS don't help at all!
    Thanks everyone.......!!!!!! :)

    • ANSWER:
      Try Pepcid.... available over the counter.

      Treatment

      Physicians recommend lifestyle modifications when not recommending drugs to treat GERD. A 2006 review suggested that evidence for most dietary interventions is anecdotal; only weight loss and elevating the head of the bed were supported by evidence[6]. A subsequent randomized crossover study showed benefit by avoiding eating two hours before bed.[2]

      Foods

      Certain foods and lifestyle are considered to promote gastroesophageal reflux:

      * Coffee, alcohol, and excessive amounts of Vitamin C supplements stimulate gastric acid secretion. Taking these before bedtime especially can cause evening reflux. (Although a study published in 2006 by Stanford University researchers indicates there is no published evidence of dietary changes benefiting those with GERD.[6])
      * Antacids based on calcium carbonate (but not aluminum hydroxide) were found to actually increase the acidity of the stomach. However, all antacids reduced acidity in the lower esophagus, so the net effect on GERD symptoms may still be positive.[7].
      * Foods high in fats and smoking reduce lower esophageal sphincter competence, so avoiding these tends to help. Fat also delays stomach emptying.
      * Eating within 2-3 hours before bedtime.
      * Large meals. Having more but smaller meals reduces GERD risk, as it means there is less food in the stomach at any one time.
      * Carbonated soft drinks with or without sugar.
      * Chocolate and peppermint.
      * Acidic foods, such as oranges and tomatoes.
      * Cruciferous vegetables: onions, cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, spinach, brussels sprouts.
      * Milk and milk-based products contain calcium and fat, and should be avoided for 2 hours before bedtime.

      Positional therapy

      Sleeping on the left side has been shown to drastically reduce nighttime reflux episodes in patients.[8].

      Elevating the head of the bed is also effective. When combining drug therapy, food avoidance before bedtime, and elevation of the head of the bed, over 95% of patients will have complete relief[citation needed]. Additional conservative measures may be considered if there is incomplete relief. Another approach is to apply all conservative measures for maximum response. A meta-analysis suggested that elevating the head of bed is an effective therapy, although this conclusion was only supported by nonrandomized studies [6].

      The head of the bed can be elevated by plastic or wooden bed risers that support bed posts or legs, a bed wedge pillow, or a wedge or an inflatable mattress lifter that fits in between mattress and box spring. The height of the elevation is critical and must be at least 6 to 8 inches (15 to 20 cm) to be at least minimally effective to prevent the backflow of gastric fluids. It should be noted that some innerspring mattresses do not work well when inclined and tend to cause back pain, thus foam mattresses are to be preferred. Some practitioners use higher degrees of incline than provided by the commonly suggested 6 to 8 inches (15 to 20 cm) and claim greater success.

      Drug treatment

      A number of drugs are registered for GERD treatment, and they are among the most-often-prescribed forms of medication in most Western countries. They can be used in combination with other drugs, although some antacids can interfere with the function of other drugs:

      * Proton pump inhibitors are the most effective in reducing gastric acid secretion. These drugs stop acid secretion at the source of acid production, i.e., the proton pump.
      * Antacids before meals or symptomatically after symptoms begin can reduce gastric acidity (increase pH).
      * Alginic acid (Gaviscon) may coat the mucosa as well as increase pH and decrease reflux. A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials suggests alginic acid may be the most effective of non-prescription treatments with a number needed to treat of 4 [9].
      * Gastric H2 receptor blockers such as ranitidine or famotidine can reduce gastric secretion of acid. These drugs are technically antihistamines. They relieve complaints in about 50% of all GERD patients. Compared to placebo (which also is associated with symptom improvement), they have a number needed to treat of eight (8) [9].
      * Prokinetics strengthen the LES and speed up gastric emptying. Cisapride, a member of this class, was withdrawn from the market for causing Long QT syndrome.
      * Sucralfate (Carafate ) is also useful as an adjunct in helping to heal and prevent esophageal damage caused by GERD, however it must be taken several times daily and at least two (2) hours apart from meals and medications.

      Posture and GERD

      In adults, a slouched posture is an important factor contributing to GERD. With a slouched posture there is no straight path between the stomach and esophagus; muscles around the esophagus go into a spasm. Gas and acidity get blocked in the spasm, causing coughing and other asthma-like symptoms. A meta-analysis suggested that elevating the head of the bed is an effective therapy, although this conclusion was only supported by nonrandomized studies.[6]

      Surgical treatment

      The standard surgical treatment, sometimes preferred over longtime use of medication, is the Nissen fundoplication. The upper part of the stomach is wrapped around the LES to strengthen the sphincter and prevent acid reflux and to repair a hiatal hernia. The procedure is often done laparoscopically.[10]

      An obsolete treatment is vagotomy ("highly selective vagotomy"), the surgical removal of vagus nerve branches that innervate the stomach lining. This treatment has been largely replaced by medication.

      Other treatments

      In 2000 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved two endoscopic devices to treat chronic heartburn. One system, Endocinch, puts stitches in the LES to create little pleats that help strengthen the muscle. Another, the Stretta Procedure, uses electrodes to apply radio frequency energy to the LES. The long-term outcomes of both procedures compared to a Nissen fundoplication are still being determined.

      Subsequently the NDO Surgical Plicator was cleared by the FDA for endoscopic GERD treatment. The Plicator creates a plication, or fold, of tissue near the gastroesophageal junction, and fixates the plication with a suture-based implant. The Plicator is currently marketed by NDO Surgical, Inc. [1].

      Another treatment that involved injection of a solution during endoscopy into the lower esophageal wall was available for about one year ending in late 2005. It was marketed under the name Enteryx. It was removed from the market due to several reports of complications from misplaced injections.

  4. QUESTION:
    How long does it take for high doses of vitamin d to get out of my system?
    I was prescribed 'colecalciferol' for being low in vitamin d.
    I was given 16 colecalciferol (Vit D3) 200000u caps

    But I only took 8 tablets, instead of 16 so I took 8 colecalciferol (Vit D3) 10,000u caps
    The sides effects are diarrhea, constipation, flatulence and feeling bloated.
    I have all those side effects. I even got a rash but it went in a day.

    I stopped taking these tablets 10 days ago.
    I have been having the symtoms for 6 days, flatulance, bloated, diarrhea and constipation.
    I went to the doctors and she said it was the vitamin d tablets. She gave me 'Gaviscon' I took Gaviscon for 3 days. I took 3 tablets per day so I took 9 tablets altogether.

    How long do I have to wait until the flatulence, diarrhea and constipation stop? I have a terrible stomach ache aswel. It has been 6 days :( and its the worst thing ever.
    Advise please, when do you think the side effects will stop?
    I understand I overdosed on vitamin d. :(

    • ANSWER:
      Not sure why you had the dose you said. Usual to load a lower dose even when your D3 is very low. Then you go on to 800-1000 International Units of D3 per day forever. Call this doctor back and get something else to help you.

      If you are low in D3, you should also be taking calcium daily.

  5. QUESTION:
    im taking nexium, is this making me gain weight?
    hi i been gaining weight for a while now & think it may be the nexium 40mg daily for gerd, also i have a fatty liver & i think thats from the weight gain, im 40 & if the nexium is the problem ill have the gerd repaired rather than the nexium. Lyndon

    • ANSWER:
      I take Nexium as well, Nexium is the brand name, Esompeprazole is the generic name. I find it to be a really good drug, unfortunately to save on costs my dr keeps putting me on Omeprazole which is nowhere good at keeping the reflux at bay.
      I put on weight after starting it (I have damaged the valve at the top of my oesphagus which causes acid to burn my throat causing throat bleeding) and was worried that the meds were to blame.
      I did manage to lose weight on it so i don't think the two are related, and logically there is now reason for it to be.
      The Nexium is a proton pump inhibitor, it works by stopping your stomach producing acid. If anything a lack of acid would be more likely to cause malnutition as without acid it is harder to digest foods.
      Osteporosis is linked to taking any of the ppi's, due to the fact that calcium absorption is impaired. It can also cause, in rare, cases lead to breast development in men (but please do not think it is likely to happen to you, every reported side effect has to be included).
      Also there is a worry if you were to eat food that has bacteria in it, you are more likely to get food poisoning, again that is a rare occurence, but just be aware of the fact.
      The main thing to improve your gerd I'm afraid to say is weight loss, easier said than done I know. Any pressure will push the contents of your stomach up, inhibiting healing. Also don't drink or smoke. Thry to wear loose fitting clothes, and don't bend after eating, or eat near bedtime. Try putting bricks or phonebooks under the feet of your bed where your head is, this is really good.
      The nexium really is the best treatment, surgery brings its own dangers, but only you and your conusltant can decide what is best for you, so do talk to them about it.
      The only reason I can see how it could cause weight gain is by stopping the burning, which allows you eat more.
      There are other treatments you can try, for example gaviscon, or one of the H2 antagonists such as Zantac, but if your gerd is bad they wouldn't be appropriate.
      I would ask if you need to be at such a high dose, it should be lowered to the minimum dose to keep your symptoms under control. For gerd yoiu could probably get away with 20mgs, and use gaviscon when needed, but again you must ask yoir doctor first.
      I think it would be better to sort out your diet and exercise/lifestyle, you say yio've got fatty liver, all the proton pump inhibitors can make liver problems worse - that's not to say to stop, nexium is far less damaging to your liver than a healthy lifestyle.
      Talk to your doctor and good luck

  6. QUESTION:
    I took vitamin d with cipro?
    Im 17 and Ive been taking cipro for a UTI and this is my last day taking it. But for the past two days and this morning I took vitamin d right with the cipro because nobody told me about this! Could I die? Get cancer? Now I'm really afraid!

    • ANSWER:
      Cipro belongs to a class of potent antibiotics called quinolones. These drugs have become quite popular in recent years because they can help cure a wide variety of infections.

      Side effects are uncommon and bacteria appear slower to develop resistance to such medications.

      Cipro is especially useful against hard-to-treat infections that affect the lungs, urinary tract, skin, bones and joints.

      This antibiotic also works against traveler's diarrhea and other bugs that invade the digestive tract.
      Side Effects and Interactions

      Cipro may cause lightheadedness. Do not drive or attempt any activity that requires coordination and judgment if you become impaired.

      Some people report restlessness, insomnia, nightmares, dizziness, tremor, headache, or irritability while taking this medicine.

      Such symptoms can be made worse by coffee or the asthma medicine theophylline.

      Cipro affects the liver and may allow caffeine and theophylline to build up to toxic levels in the body.

      Because Cipro may cause digestive tract upset, nausea, pain or diarrhea, you may be tempted to use an antacid. That could be a big mistake.

      Aluminum or calcium-based products, including Di-Gel, Gaviscon, Maalox, Mylanta, and Tums, can dramatically interfere with the absorption of Cipro. Wait at least two hours after taking Cipro before swallowing an antacid.

      Vitamin and mineral formulas can also cause problems, so they should not be taken at the same time either.

      Other side effects are rare, but be alert for changes in vision, rash, sores in the mouth, joint pain or stiffness, chest pain or heart palpitations, urinary changes, or breathing difficulty. Report any symptoms or suspected side effects to your physician promptly.
      Special Precautions

      Pregnant women and children should not take Cipro. Others may be allergic to this medication.

      If you experience symptoms such as breathing difficulty, wheezing, sneezing, hives, or itching, obtain emergency medical attention.

      Life-threatening anaphylactic shock is rare, but it demands instant treatment.

      People with kidney disease should take Cipro only under careful medical supervision, as special dosage modifications may have to be made.

      Liver enzyme elevations have also been noted, so periodic blood tests will be necessary if you have to take this medicine for any length of time.
      Taking the Medicine

      Cipro is absorbed more efficiently when it is taken on an empty stomach. The manufacturer recommends that it be swallowed two hours after a meal.

      If this medicine upsets your stomach, though, it can be swallowed with food without losing potency.
      If you found this information of interest, you may wish to subscribe to our free online newsletter. It offers questions and answers about drugs, home remedies, nutrition and non-drug approaches to healing; commentaries on the most pressing health issues of the day; special alerts on breaking health news as it happens and coverage of the top health headlines of the week.

  7. QUESTION:
    If you're taking "Synthroid"...?
    Have you ever had problems with your heart racing/adding a beat while on "Synthroid" and did adjusting the dosage amount help? I've had a Cardiologist check me for any heart problems last year and they say everything is normal also my blood pressure is always "normal", but I've just started having extra heart beats (seems to be stronger after taking my Synthroid)... When I called my Thyroid doctors office, they just tell me to go to my Cardiologist. Why won't they just send me to get my blood drawn for my TSH level, which I'm strongly thinking it is. I'm sick of being sent from doctor to doctor and learning nothing new and paying out all this $$$. Why do doctors think we are made out of money?

    Is there any Thyroid support groups that you know of?

    Thanks in advance for any helpful advice...

    • ANSWER:
      I thought I'd see what I could find online for you.

      This is an awesome site and may provide good info about support groups: http://www.allthyroid.org/

      And here is some more general info about side effects:
      What are the possible side effects of levothyroxine?

      Stop using levothyroxine and get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

      Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects:
      headache;
      sleep problems (insomnia);
      nervous or irritable feeling;
      fever, hot flashes, sweating;
      changes in your menstrual periods;
      appetite changes, weight changes;

      Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur.

      You may experience mild hair loss. Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome.

      What other drugs will affect levothyroxine?

      The following drugs may cause medical problems if you use them with levothyroxine: lithium, amiodarone, or antidepressants. Tell your doctor if you have recently received radiation therapy with iodine (such as I-131).

      There are many other drugs not listed that can affect levothyroxine. Tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start using a new medication without telling your doctor.

      Certain medicines can be continued, but they may make levothyroxine less effective if taken at the same time. If you use any of the following drugs, use them at least 4 hours before or 4 hours after you take levothyroxine:
      calcium carbonate (Caltrate, Citracal, Oystercal, and others);
      ferrous sulfate iron supplement;
      sucralfate (Carafate);
      sodium polystyrene sulfonate (Kayexalate, Kionex, and others);
      antacids that contain aluminum (Amphojel, Gaviscon, Maalox, Mylanta, Riopan, Rulox, Tums, and others); and
      cholesterol-lowering drugs cholestyramine (Questran) and colestipol (Colestid).

      Here is a big list of thyroid support groups around the US:
      http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art31482.asp

  8. QUESTION:
    I have acid reflux and for a yr I have had swelling in my neck and under my?
    tongue. The doc has said that it was because the acid had burned up the base of my tongue and throat. half of my tongue goes numb and my neck feeles like it has a pulled muscle all the time. I have had blood work and a ct and nothing but its acually getting worse and speading to a bigger area. All the nodes in my neck and mouth are swollen. Anyone have this happen or any ideas where I should go next?
    I have been to 2 different ent's and had a upper GI, ct scans, blood work and x rays. They can see the sylvia glands and lymph nodes are swollen but no masses or anything. Also I had mono around the same time this all started which was after a ear surgery my throat never got better then I noticed the lymph nodes on my neck thats when they said I had silent acid reflux, because before that I didn't have any of these problems. The swellings just a pain in the neck and under the tongue. I just cant see this all coming from acid.

    • ANSWER:
      Acid reflux is usually caused by insufficient stomach acid/lack of digestive enzymes. H Pylori bacteria is also a common cause. High acid is rare. My mother no longer suffers GERD or LPR after throwing away the OTC antacid gaviscon and Proton Pump Inhibitor nexium and taking digestive enzyme supplements to improve digestion and betaine HCL with pepsin supplements to improve stomach acid. GERD and LPR were gone in two weeks (had suffered severely for 5 years!). A year later of these supplements, 25 years of gastritis improved 90%. Amazing is an understatement!

      If you are taking acid blockers, then deficiencies are guaranteed to occur as you need stomach acid to digest essential nutrients. Most noted deficiencies of lowering stomach acid include vitamin B12 and magnesium. Deficiencies of magneisum and vitamin B12 both affect the nerves, cause problems with the esophageal muscles such as problems swallowing or a feeling of choking/gagging and can cause numbness. Magnesium is essential for calcium and vitamin D absorption as well. You haven't listed what drugs you are taking, but nexium for example states numbness and swollen lymph nodes as just two of the thousands of symptoms.

      It's very detrimental to health to take acid blockers. As stated on the package for acid blockers, do not longer than 8 weeks. FDA made a statement for Proton Pump Inhibitors such as nexium and prilosec - to take no longer than 14 days, 3 times a year.

      Where you should go to next is stopping all acid lowering medication and go to your local health store to purchase digestive enzymes. You can trial betaine HCI with pepsin or even try apple cider vinegar. It works but it can take time to trial out various brands, how much to take etc.

      Excerpt from a very good article >>>

      "The bottom line here is that most people are very confused about the role stomach acid plays in health. Most people:

      Think they have too much, when in fact they have too little.
      Treat the symptom and suppress stomach acid production, ultimately leading to long-term health problems.
      Ultimately lose the capacity to produce sufficient stomach acid as a result of dietary abuse and continual use of medications to suppress the body's ability to produce it.
      Don't get into that trap.

      Use digestive enzymes with all your meals.
      Drink aloe vera juice.
      Use probiotic supplements with confidence.
      Use proteolytic enzyme supplements with confidence.
      And, if needed, use apple cider vinegar or betaine hydrochloride supplements to make up for stomach acid insufficiency."

      Digestive Health, Stomach Acid & Enzyme Formulas >>>
      http://www.jonbarron.org/enzymes/proteolytic-formulas-digestive-health-stomach-acid

      Side effects of antacids and acid blockers >>>
      http://refluxdefense.com/heartburn_GERD_articles/side-effects-antacids-and-acid-blockers.html


gaviscon side effects calcium

This entry was posted in Heartburn and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply